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The following course are offered by the Modern Languages Department.

Chinese (CHI)

This course is for students who have no previous background in Modern Chinese (Mandarin). The pronunciation is that of Peking. Skills in comprehension, reading, and writing are developed, but emphasis is on speaking.
This is the continuation of the study of Chinese, developing and strengthening skills in comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The pronunciation taught is that of Peking. Emphasis is on speaking. Prerequisite: CHI 101 or departmental approval
This course is for students who have had no previous background in Mandarin Chinese. Grammar is taught inductively and simple texts are read. Speaking, reading, and writing are emphasized.
Prerequisite: Departmental Placement
Students will continue the study of basic Chinese grammar begun in CHI 105. They will also further their skills in listening comprehension, reading and writing in Chinese.
Prerequisite: CHI 105 or Departmental Placement
This course includes a review of grammar plus the study of Chinese civilization and selected readings in Chinese literature. Self-expression through oral and written reports is emphasized. Prerequisite: CHI 102 or departmental approval
This is an intensive writing and reading course in Chinese language. While developing integrated language skills, it emphasizes writing and critical analysis of content materials. The texts concentrate on Chinese contemporary and classical literary writings, as well as texts treating Chinese culture and history. Prerequisite: CHI 200 or departmental approval
A study of 20th century Chinese literary development, this course examines the literary writings, major authors and literary movements in cultural and historical contexts. The course also reviews the development of China's ethnic minority literature, the growth of popular literature, and the evolution of regional literature. Course readings include selected writings from four historical periods: 1900-16, 1917-49, 1949-85 and 1986-2000. Written projects and oral reports are required.
Prerequisite: CHI 210 or departmental approval or any other 400-level Chinese course, except CHI 476
This is a study abroad course that further develops students¿ Chinese language skills and expands their knowledge of Chinese culture and social development. The course is offered as the major part of the Study-Abroad-in-China Program, which includes a combination of class meetings, seminars and field trips to places of historic interest and cultural importance. The course provides opportunities for students to gain first-hand experience about contemporary Chinese cultural life. While participating in skill-based language learning activities that improve students¿ competence in listening, speaking, readng and writing, the course gives students opportunities to attend lectures that provide information about Chinese cultural patterns, customs, literature, history, social development and traditions of art and music. The course adopts a unique transcultural-linguistic approach to instruction that efficiently facilitates and enhances the learning of Chinese language and culture. Prerequisite: CHI 102 or above, or proficiency in CHI 102 as determined by the Modern Languages Department placement test and at least 3 credits in a foreign language taught at CUNY.

French (FRN)

This is a course for students who have had no previous background in French. Grammar is taught inductively and simple texts are read. Speaking, reading, and writing are emphasized.
In this continuation of French I, grammar, composition, oral comprehension of simple literary texts are developed supplemented by readings and analysis of French texts.
This course is for students who have had no previous background in French. Grammar is taught inductively and simple texts are read. Speaking, reading, and writing are emphasized.
Prerequisite: Departmental Placement
Students will continue the study of basic French grammar begun in FRN 105. They will also further their skills in listening comprehension, reading and writing in French.
Prerequisite: FRN 105 or Departmental Placement
This course for non-native students having mastered two semesters of French is designed to build confidence and competence in conversing in French. Prerequisite: FRN 102 or departmental approval
This course includes a review of grammar plus the study of French civilization and selected readings in French literature.
While reviewing advanced grammar, students are trained in literary analysis through the works of modern French authors.
This course involves intensive oral work consisting of discussions in French based on literary texts of the 20th century with drills in pronunciation, intonation and rhythm. Intensive use is made of the language laboratory. Prerequisite: FRN 200 or departmental approval
This course explores literature written in French from countries outside of France. Works from French Canada, the Caribbean islands (Guadeloupe, Martinique, and Haiti) as well as North and West Africa will be included. Themes highlighting cultural and social differences with France will be discussed. Readings, written work, and oral reports will be in French. Prerequisite: FRN 210 or departmental approval, or any 400 level course
The chronological evolution of French literature and its relation to French culture and ideas are studied. Major works by representative authors from the 17th century are read and discussed with emphasis on ideas and style. Included are selections from Corneille, Moliere, Racine, la Fontaine, Bossuet, Fenelon, Fontenelle, and Marivaux (introduction to early 18th century trends and post-revolution changes in classical literature). Written and oral reports are required. Prerequisite: FRN 210 or departmental approval, or any 400 level course
This course concentrates on the literature of the Enlightenment and the 19th century as reflected in the works of Voltaire, Rousseau, Montesquieu, Balzac, Flaubert, Stendhal and the Romantic and Symbolist poets. Written and oral reports are required. This course may be taken before French V.
Prerequisite: FRN 210 or departmental approval, or any 400 level course
In this study of the major writers and literary movements (surrealism, avant-garde, existentialism) of the 20th century, emphasis is placed on novelists like Proust, Mauriac and Camus; playwrights such as Claudel, Giraudoux, Sartre, Anouilh, Ionesco and Beckett; and the poets Valery, Eluard and Aragon. Written and oral reports are required. This course may be taken before French V and French VI.
This course introduces students to literature and cinema from French speaking West African countries. We will study various works from the 1950?s up to the present through five major themes: oral tradition, cultural alienation, social and political criticism, women's condition and the old/new generation conflict. Documents studied will include novels, documentaries, fiction, films and songs. Some of the authors to be considered include: D.T. Niane, Camara Laye, Ahmadou Kourouma, Sembene Ousmane, Djirbril Diop Mambety, Maraima Ba and Safi Faye. This course is taught in French.
The course reviews grammar and syntax and includes advanced translation and composition, with emphasis on building essential business vocabulary and idioms, basic writing styles, and speech structures most frequently used in French correspondence and office communications. This course is open to Business, Liberal Arts and Office Administration students. Prerequisite: Functional knowledge of French, FRN 200, or departmental approval
The objective of this course is to increase the ability to communicate both orally and in writing in more complex business situations. Emphasis is placed on writing commercial letters and on intensive oral practice of related speech structures.
Prerequisite: FRN 455 or departmental approval
The course brings to life the essentials of existentialist philosophy in plays and novels of French authors such as Sartre and Camus, with modern insights into the age-old question of free choice and predestination, the relevancy or irrelevancy of God, commitment or alienation, and the meaning or the absurdity of life. Readings are in French; class discussions and written work in English/ French.
Prerequisite: FRN 210 or departmental approval, or any 400 level course
Based on works by Chateaubriand, Stendhal, Balzac, and Zola, this course analyzes the relationship between the individual and society undergoing critical changes. Special attention is given to the problem of the Romantic ego in a materialistic society and the coming of age of a new "hero" emerging from the Industrial Revolution. Readings are in French; discussion and written work in English or French.
Prerequisite: FRN 210 or departmental approval, or any 400 level course
This is a history survey of the theories of French Theater evolved from the Greek Tragedy through medieval, classical Romantic, Realistic, Symbolist and Surrealist theater up to Avant-garde Theater and the Theater of the Absurd. Readings are in French, discussion in English.
Prerequisite: FRN 210 or departmental approval, or any 400 level course
The main aspects of French life and culture as expressed in social, intellectual, and philosophical history are studied in this course. Emphasis is given to the geographic situation, economic, and social changes; the main trends of thought in French tradition, and their impact on modern France. Readings are in French, discussion in English and French. Prerequisite: FRN 200 or departmental approval
This is a study abroad course that will further develop students' four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in French. Students will consolidate their knowledge of grammar through contextualized analysis. Students will also do further work on selected contemporary themes related to French society and institutions (e.g., the press in France, cinema, food, etc.) Prerequisite: FRN 102 or departmental approval. GPA of 3.0 or above.

German (GER)

This is a course for students who have had no previous background in German. Grammar is taught inductively and simple texts are read. Skills in comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are developed.
In this continuation of German I, grammar, composition, conversation, reading and analysis of simple literary texts are covered. Prerequisite: GER 101 or departmental approval

Italian (ITL)

This course is for students who have had no previous background in Italian. Grammar is taught inductively and simple texts are read. Skills in comprehension, speaking, reading and writing are developed.
In this continuation of Italian I, grammar, composition, conversation, and reading of Italian texts are covered. Prerequisite: ITL 101 or departmental approval
This course is for students who have had no previous background in Italian. Grammar is taught inductively and simple texts are read. Speaking, reading, and writing are emphasized.
Prerequisite: Departmental Placement
Students will continue the study of basic Italian grammar begun in ITL 105. They will also further their skills in listening comprehension reading and writing in Italian.
Prerequisite: ITL 105 or Departmental Placement
This liberal arts elective is an introduction to the evolution and development of Italian culture and civilization through the literary and artistic features, geared to the understanding of present day problems of modern European Italy and the Italian-American people. Readings are in English, and term papers are in English.
Study in this course includes a review of grammar and of composition. Modern prose is read, discussed and analyzed.
This intensive writing course emphasizes comprehension, writing, and analysis of Italian contemporary and classical texts.

Spanish (SPN)

This course is for students who have had no previous background in Spanish. Grammar is taught inductively and simple texts are read. Speaking, reading and writing are emphasized
In this continuation of Spanish I, grammar, composition and oral comprehension are developed and supplemented by readings or Spanish texts. Students who have taken SPN 103 will not receive credit for this course. Prerequisite: SPN 101 or departmental approval
This is an elementary Spanish course for students who can speak Spanish but have no formal training in the language. Students who have taken SPN 101 and/or SPN 102 will not receive credit for this course. Prerequisite: Knowledge of spoken Spanish and departmental approval
This course is for students who have had no previous background in Spanish. Grammar is taught inductively and simple texts are read. Speaking, reading, and writing are emphasized students who have taken SPN 103 will not receive credit for this course.
Prerequisite: Departmental Placement
In this continuation of Spanish I, grammar, composition and oral comprehension are developed and supplemented by readings or Spanish texts. Students who have taken SPN 107 will not receive credit for this course.
Prerequisite: SPN 105 or Departmental Placement
This is an elementary Spanish course for students who can speak Spanish but have no formal training in the language. Students who have taken SPN 101 and/or SPN 102 will not receive credit for this course.
Prerequisite: Knowledge of spoken Spanish and Departmental Placement
Designed primarily for Health/Medical area students, this course emphasizes the practice of conversation based on medical terminology and useful expressions and idioms. Classes will be assigned according to the student's background in Spanish. Use is made of the language laboratory.
This course for non-native speaking students may follow the two semester sequence in Spanish. It is designed to build confidence and competence in conversing in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN 102 or departmental approval
Study in this course includes a review of grammar and reading plus discussion of selected works by modern authors. Self-expression through oral and written reports is emphasized. Prerequisite: SPN 102 or SPN 103 or departmental approval
This intensive writing course emphasizes comprehension, writing, and analysis of contemporary and classical texts. Prerequisite: SPN 200 or departmental approval
This course introduces students to a representative sampling of Latin American women writers from the colonial period to the twentieth century. The course will disseminate a body of literature, which is represented minimally in Hispanic literature courses. Feminism, machismo, motherhood, sexual and political activism and the role of women as writers are some of the issues that will be explored and discussed during the semester.
This course is a survey of major trends in Spanish-American theatre from pre-Columbian times to the present with emphasis on 20th century theatre. Among the authors who will be studied are: Gonzalez Eslava, Ruiz De Alarcon, Sor Juana Ines De La Cruz, Florencio Sanchez, Rodolfo Usigli, Egon Wolff, Augusto Boal, Jose Triana, Jorge Diaz, Luis Rafael Sanchez, Griselda Gambaro, Isadora Aguirre.
This course is an introduction to Spanish theatre through the reading and analysis of the major playwrights—Lope de Vega, Calderón, Moratín, El Duque de Rivas, Galdós, Benavente—from the Seventeenth Century to the Generation of 1898.
Prerequisite: SPN 210 or departmental approval, or any 400 level course except SPN 476
This course is an in-depth study of the poetry of representative Spanish poets with emphasis on the generation of 1927. Poets studied include Géngora, Bécquer, Machado, Alberti, Lorca, León Felipe, and José A. Goytisolo.
Prerequisite: SPN 210 or departmental approval, or any 400 level course except SPN 476
A chronological study is made of Spanish literature against its cultural and ideological background. Major works by representative writers from the Middle Ages to the end of the Golden Age are read and analyzed. Readings include selections from the "Poema de Mio Cid," Don Juan Manuel, Jorge Manrique, Fernando de Rojas, Cervantes, Quevedo, and Calderon de la Barca. Written and oral reports are required. Prerequisite: SPN 210 or departmental approval, or any 400 level course except SPN 476
This course is a survey of the representative authors of the 18th and 19th centuries - Moratin, el Duque de Rivas, Larra, Becquer, Zorilla and Galdos - with emphasis on neoclassicism, romanticism, and realism in the novel, theater and poetry of the period. Reading and oral reports are required. Prerequisite: SPN 210 or departmental approval, or any 400 level course except SPN 476
This course studies the short story as major form of literary expression in the Spanish speaking countries of the Caribbean: Colombia, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and Venezuela. It studies the development of the short story beginning with Indian legends recreated by Spaniards during the early Colonial period. Examples of short stories written during the different literary movements are studied and analyzed. The relationship between the writer and society is analyzed as well as the common history, culture, and socio-economic problems which are reflected in each story. Note: This course is taught in Spanish and satisfies the Liberal Arts requirement for Modern Language.
Prerequisite: SPN 210 or departmental approval
The major authors and literary movements of the 20th century in Spain are studied with emphasis on representative genres. Works of Unamuno, Ortega, Machado, Juan R. Jimenez, Salinas, Garcia Lorca, Cela and others are analyzed. Written and oral reports are required.
Spanish-American Literature This course involves a chronological history of Spanish- American literature from the Colonial period to the 19th century. Readings include selections from el Inca Garcilaso, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, Sarmiento, Jose Hernandez, Palma, Marti, Dario, and others. Written and oral reports are required. Prerequisite: SPN 210 or departmental approval, or any 400 level course except SPN 476
The major authors and literary movements of the late 19th and 20th centuries are studied. Works of Quiroga, Reyes, Neruda, Vallejo, Carpentier, Borges, Rulfo, Fuentes, Marques and others are analyzed. Written and oral reports are required.
Grammar I (Commercial Spanish I) Designed primarily for Office Administration students, this course develops linguistic skills related to writing business letters and legal documents. The first term covers technical vocabulary and mastery of the language through review of grammar. Open to all students. Prerequisite: SPN 210 or departmental approval, or any 400 level course except SPN 476
Grammar II (Commercial Spanish II ) A continuation of SPN 455, this course provides intensive practice in linguistic skills involving business letters and legal documents which can be of special value for Office Administration bilingual students. Stress is placed on composition. Open to all students. Prerequisite: SPN 210 or departmental approval
The evolution of Spanish-American civilization is studied through literature to enhance understanding of present-day problems and potentialities. Emphasis falls on the relevance of the topography of the regions, the Spanish conquest and colonization, conflicts among cultures and religions of the indigenous peoples: Hispanic settlers, Africans, and recent immigrants; oral and written transmissions of traditions; the struggle for independence; movements for political, social, and economic reforms; the cultural obstacles, the emergence of linguistic distinctiveness and the quest for self-realization are studied. Readings are in Spanish, discussions are in English or Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN 210 or departmental approval, or any 400 level Spanish course except SPN 476
This course is a survey of the literature, culture and civilization of the Greater Antilles (Cuba, Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo, Haiti and, Jamaica) geared to the understanding of their heritage as it is preserved by their languages and their artistic achievements. Readings are mainly in English; class discussions are in English, Spanish, and any other modern language. Prerequisite: SPN 210 or departmental approval, or any 400 level course except SPN 476
This is a study abroad course in which students will enhance their language skills and knowledge of a foreign culture through class meetings, seminars, and on-site visits to places of historic and cultural importance. They will be immersed in the language of the country and attend language and literature courses. Prerequisite: SPN 102 or departmental approval
This course will introduce students to film adaptations of Spanish and Latin American novels, short stories, diaries and theater plays in the context of the literary and film debate: how does film "translate" text? Should the film be "faithful" to the text? If so, faithful to what aspects, plot dialouge, chronology, social and psychological and socioeconomic backgrounds will be included. Special attention will be given to the study of nationality, gender and sexual differences within Spanish and Latin American societies. Students will examine the connections between text and film, as well as the fundamentals of written and visual identification with the cinematid and texual apparatus.

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Borough of Manhattan Community College
The City University of New York
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