Trisha M Brady

Picture of Trisha    Brady


Assistant Professor
English

EMAIL: tbrady@bmcc.cuny.edu

Office: N-751

Office Hours: M 11:15-11:45; Th 11:00 -1:30; and by appt. (Spring 2020)

Phone: +1 (212) 220-8000;ext=7390

Dr. Brady is an Assistant Professor of English at the Borough of Manhattan Community College where she teaches diverse courses in American and World literature along with intensive writing and composition. Her teaching and research interests span nineteenth-century and twentieth-century American literature and modern World literature. A native of East Tennessee, Dr. Brady was a first-generation college student who received her B.A. in English from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She completed her M.A. in English with a Certificate in Cultural Studies at the University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, and earned her doctoral degree at the State University of New York, Buffalo.

Expertise

Rhetoric and Composition, American Literature, Modern World Literature, Literary Theory, Literary Criticism

Degrees

  • Ph.D. S.U.N.Y. at Buffalo,  English,  2010
  • M.A. University of Pittsburgh,  English with a Certificate in Cultural Studies,  2001
  • B.A. University of Tennessee, English, 1999

Courses Taught

Research and Projects

Dr. Brady’s current project, “Unsettled Readers: Dissemblance, Storytelling, and Chesnutt’s Art of Resistance in The Conjure Woman,” examines how Charles Chesnutt’s fiction represents the possibility for community and fraternity through storytelling. She is interested in how Chesnutt’s writing reflects the interpretation of alternative accounts of history that are distorted and embedded in fiction. For example, her analysis of The Conjure Woman (1899) meditates on Chesnutt’s strategic use of storytelling. In particular, she considers how Chesnutt’s conjure tales attempt to unsettle his readers’ interpretive strategies and communities and incite empathetic and ethical responses to representations of traumatic recollection.

Publications

“The Body is a Vessel” (refereed creative nonfiction, blind submission), Alchemy, vol. 45, June 2019, pp. 14-16.

“Teaching Students to Engage Scholarly Sources: A Sequential Assignment” (peer-reviewed, blind submission), Teaching English in the Two-Year College, vol. 46, no. 3, March 2019, pp. 243-244.

“Negotiating Linguistic Borderlands, Valuing Linguistic Diversity, and Incorporating Border Pedagogy in a College Composition Classroom” (peer-reviewed, blind submission),  Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Studies, vol. 5, no. 2, March 2019, pp. 1-30.

“‘what rainbows teach and sunsets show’: departure, return and synchronicity” (refereed creative nonfiction, not blind submitted), Months to Years, Summer 2018, pp. 26-29.

“getting the ship under weigh: A Political Companion to Herman Melville” (review essay), boundary 2: an international journal of literature and culture, b2o, 2014.

Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” Masterplots II Christian Literature. Salem P, 2007.

The Souls of Black Folk,” Masterplots II Christian Literature. Salem P, 2007.

“A Poem for Black Hearts,” Masterplots II Poetry Series, Revised Edition. Salem P, 2002.

Honors, Awards and Affiliations

Honors and Awards:

Grants:

Recipient, PSC-CUNY Grant Award, Traditional A Award, Cycle 51, 2020.

Awards:

Nominee, Distinguished Teaching Award, BMCC, Spring 2020.

Nominee, Distinguished Teaching Award, BMCC, Spring 2019.

Membership in Professional Societies:

Modern Language Association

Northeast Modern Language Association

Society for the Study of American Women Writers

Additional Information

Selected Conference Presentations:

Paper presentation, “‘Was It Love?’: Deferred Desire and the ‘Republic of the Spirit’ in Wharton’s The House of Mirth,” Edith Wharton’s New York Conference, Wharton Society, New York, NY, The New Yorker Hotel, June 17-20, 2020. Panel: Session 12-A: Class, Mobility, and Place. (Conference cancelled due to COVID-19.)

Roundtable presentation, “Reading and Walking in Whitman’s New York City: An Experiential Writing Assignment,” Northeast Modern Language Association, Boston, MA, Marriott Copley Place, March 5-8, 2020. Roundtable panel: How to Teach Walt Whitman in the 21st Century (Part 2).

Paper presentation, “Whitman’s Spiritual Song of Resistance,” Northeast Modern Language Association, Washington D.C., Gaylord National Harbor Conference Center, March 21-24, 2019.  Panel: American Renaissance: Conflicts, Resistance, and Reform.

Paper presentation, “Slippages in Stowe’s Argument for Abolition in Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” Society for the Study of American Women Writers, “Resistance and Recovery across the Americas,” Denver, Colorado, Nov. 7-11, 2018. Panel: Christianity and Resistance in Uncle Tom’s Cabin (Harriet Beecher Stowe Society panel).

Paper presentation, “Teaching Anzaldúa, Negotiating Linguistic Borderlands, and Valuing Linguistic Diversity in a Community College Composition Classroom,” TYCA-NE (Two- Year College English Association) 2018 Conference, “English at the Crossroads: Power and Possibilities,” LaGuardia Community College, Queens, NY, Oct. 11-13, 2018. Panel: M-108 Understanding the Self, Understanding Others: Designing Effective Assignments for a Multiple-identity Classroom.

Paper presentation, “Psychoanalytic Approaches to Teaching Antigone,” Northeast Modern Language Association, Baltimore Marriott Waterfront, Baltimore, MD, March 23-26, 2017. Panel: Psychoanalysis and Greek Tragedy.

Paper Presentation, “Answering the Call to Respond: The Christian Service and Literary Work of Octavia Albert,” Northeast Modern Language Association, Hartford, Connecticut, March 17-20, 2016. Panel: The Bible and 19th-century American Women Writers.

Paper presentation, “‘Froze(n) … forever’: The Newsreel and the Possibility for Grace in O’Connor’s ‘The Displaced Person,’” Northeast Modern Language Association, Toronto, Ontario, CA, April 30 – May 3, 2015, Panel: Ghosts in the Machine: Technology, Image, Body, Language.

Paper presentation, “Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s ‘Awful Solitude,’” Northeast Modern Language Association, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; April 3-6, 2014, Panel: Figurations of Solitude and Loneliness in American Literature.

Prior to Appointment at BMCC:

Paper presentation, “The Nightmare of the Abyss in Herman Melville’s Battle-pieces and Aspects of the War,” PCEA, Gettysburg, PA, March 15-17, 2013, Panel: Poetry of Battle.

Paper presentation, “Hegel and Terror: On the Logic of the Terror of the French Revolution and the Fury of the General Will,” Northeast Modern Language Association, New Brunswick, NJ, April 7-10, 2011, Seminar Panel: Revolutionary Terror

Paper presentation, “Representations of the Catastrophe and the Longing to Return in Palestinian Personal Account Narratives” Northeast Modern Language Association, April 7-11, 2010, Seminar Panel: Displacement, Dispossession, and Uprootedness.

Paper presentation, “Catastrophe, Collective Memory, and Belonging: Reconstructing Palestinian Identity,” Midwest Modern Language Association, St. Louis, MO, Nov. 12-15, 2009, Panel: Violent Migrations.

Paper presentation, “Representing the Trauma of War: H.D.’s Trilogy.” Lifting Belly High: A Conference on Women’s Poetry Since 1900, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, September 11-13, 2008, Panel: Violence, Trauma, and the Body.

Paper presentation, “Yearning for Redemption in the New South: Absence and Loss in William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! and The Sound and the Fury.” Northeast Modern Language Association, Buffalo, NY, April 10-13, 2008, Seminar: Representing Trauma: American Redemption Stories and Lost Cause Narratives.

Paper presentation, “Faulkner and the Rhetoric of Reconstruction and Redemption in the New South,” Midwest Modern Language Association, Chicago, IL, November 9-12, 2006, Special Session Panel: A Popular Reconstruction: Imagining Reunion in Post-Civil War American Literature.

 Paper presentation, “From White Masks to Black Skin: Progressive Resignification in Paul Beatty’s The White Boy Shuffle,” Popular Culture Association, Philadelphia, PA, April 11-14, 2001, Panel: African-American Culture.

Other Presentations and Lectures:

Paper presentation, “Roadside Redemption: Approaches to Teaching Flannery O’Connor’s ‘A Good Man is Hard to Find,’” BMCC, New York, NY, October 26, 2018, Hudson Room, Panel: BMCC English Department Short Story Panels. (Invited.)

Paper presentation and discussion, BMCC CETLS, FIG presentation and discussion on cultural transitions students experience in classes at the Language, Culture, and Society FIG, New York, NY, April 23, 2015, 4:00 PM in room S-341. (Invited.) Theme: Cultural Transitions: Students, Panelists: Laszlo Arvai (Academic Literacy and Linguistics), Trisha Brady (English), Patrizia Comello Perry (Modern Languages)

Paper presentation, BMCC English Department Faculty Forum, presenting “The Shadow of the ‘Iron Dome’: The Fear of Dominion Without Liberty in Melville’s Battle-Pieces and Aspects of the War, BMCC, Department of English, Faculty Forum, New York, NY, March 6, 2015. (Invited.)

Prior to Appointment at BMCC:

Paper presentation, “Economies of Desire and the Impossible Possibility for Love in Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth,” Center for the Study of Psychoanalysis and Culture, S.U.N.Y. at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, April 20, 2006, Symposium: Works in Enjoyment.

Guest Lecture in Professor Arabella Lyon’s Practicum in Teaching (English 599) course for new Teaching Assistants, “Commenting on Student Papers,” S.U.N.Y. at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, August 23, 2005, (Invited.)

Paper presentation, “Philosophies of and Pedagogical Strategies for Teaching Composition,”Teaching Composition Symposium: Graduate Orientation for New Teaching Assistants, S.U.N.Y. at Buffalo, Department of English, Buffalo, NY, August 2002. (Invited.)

Panels Organized and Chaired:

Chair and Organizer, Northeast Modern Language Association, Washington D.C., March 23, 2019, Panel:  American Romanticism: Conflicts, Resistance, and Reform.

Co-chair, Northeast Modern Language Association, Pittsburgh, PA, April 14, 2018, Panel: Psychoanalysis, Literature, and Culture.

Chair and Organizer, Northeast Modern Language Association, Baltimore, MD, March 25, 2017, Panel: Psychoanalysis and Greek Tragedy.

Chair and Organizer, Northeast Modern Language Association, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, May 3, 2015, Seminar: Multimodal Representations of War.

Chair, Transitions and Transactions II Conference, Panel Chair, New York, NY, CUNY, BMCC, April 25-27, 2014, April 26, 2014, Panel: B. 1 – Teaching Canonical Texts and “A Little Light Theory.”

Prior to Appointment at BMCC:

Chair and Organizer, Northeast Modern Language Association, New Brunswick, NJ, April 7-10, 2011, Seminar Panel: Revolutionary Terror.

Chair and Organizer, Northeast Modern Language Association, Montreal, Quebec, April 7-11, 2010, Seminar Panel: Displacement, Dispossession, and Uprootedness.

Chair and Organizer, Midwest Modern Language Association, St. Louis, MO, Nov. 12-15, 2009, Panel: Violent Migrations.

Organizer, Northeast Modern Language Association, Boston, MA, March 26, 2009, Seminar: Twentieth-Century American War Narratives: Representing Trauma.

Chair and Organizer, Northeast Modern Language Association, Buffalo, NY, April 10-13, 2008, Seminar: Representing Trauma: American Redemption Stories and Lost Cause Narratives.

Organizer, Northeast Modern Language Association, Baltimore, MD, March 1-4, 2007, Panel: American Literature, Literary Theory, and Constitutional Law.

Organizer, Center for the Study of Psychoanalysis and Culture, S.U.N.Y. at Buffalo, NY, April 20, 2006, Symposium: Works in Enjoyment.

 Special Topics Courses:

Fall 2014: Dr. Brady taught ENG 350, section 003, as a Special Topics course entitled American Literature and Law. Literary representations of the legal system and legal discourse can perpetuate or challenge cultural ideas and norms, including notions of justice. This course explored the intersections between the justice system and American literature by considering the way various American writers have represented societal conflict, the law, and the legal system in the United States. The class discussed the larger questions of social injustice, legal justice, and ethics while reading engaging works of fiction and non-fiction.