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Course Listings

The following courses are offered by the Science Department.

Astronomy (AST)

This course will focus on how astronomers have used observations to construct models of our Universe. Students will use their own observations (collected in the co-requisite AST 107 course) along with readings and class discussions, to construct and test models of our Universe.
Corequisite: AST 107
Course Syllabus
This course is an introductory survey course of topics in astronomical theory, especially for students who are not science-oriented. A selected number of basic topics in astronomy are carefully examined and interpreted. The relevance of the scientist and his/her work to the lives of non-scientists is continually examined.
Corequisite: AST 109
Course Syllabus
This course serves as an observational introduction to astronomy, especially for students who are not science oriented. A selected number of basic topics in astronomy are carefully examined and subjected to observational verification. The relevance of the scientist and his/her work to the lives of non-scientists is continually examined.
Corequisite: AST 108
Course Syllabus
This course introduces students to the world beyond the earth. The methods of astronomy and our knowledge of the structure of the universe are presented as an ongoing human endeavor that has helped shape modern man as he/she takes his/her first steps into space.
Course Syllabus

Biology (BIO)

General Biology presents an overview of many important topics in the natural sciences today and provides relevant background material from the physical sciences. It traces life from its beginning (cells) to the development of multi-cellular organisms. It covers topics such as evolution, the cell, macromolecules, energy relationships, inheritance, molecular genetics, biotechnology, and body systems.
Corequisite: BIO 109
Course Syllabus
General Biology presents an overview of many important topics in the natural sciences today and provides relevant background material from the physical sciences. It traces life from its beginning (cells) to the development of multi-cellular organisms. It covers topics such as taxonomy, the cell, macromolecules, photosynthesis, inheritance, molecular genetics, and body systems. This class includes a 1 hour lecture and a 2 hour lab session. The lecture hour will be an expansion of the lecture content covered in the co-requisite class BIO 108 - information needed to carry out experiments in the 2 hour hands-on laboratory experience.
Corequisite: BIO 108
Course Syllabus
Basic cellular structure, tissue organization, physiological process, reproduction, and genetics are studied. Special attention is given to selected zoological specimens with particular emphasis upon man.
Course Syllabus
This two-semester course acquaints students with the basic properties of living systems: metabolism, growth, responsiveness and reproduction at the cellular and organism levels as illustrated by assorted plants and animals. Two terms required. Corequisite for BIO 210 is ENG 101 Prerequisite for BIO 220 is BIO 210
Course Syllabus
This two-semester course acquaints students with the basic properties of living systems: metabolism, growth, responsiveness and reproduction at the cellular and organism levels as illustrated by assorted plants and animals. Two terms required.
Course Syllabus
This introductory course includes the study of structure, metabolism, environmental significance and evolution of micro-organisms. The laboratory will emphasize basic bacteriological techniques of identification and culture.
Prerequisite: BIO 220
Course Syllabus
Genetics is designed as a one-semester course covering the fundamental concepts of classical, molecular, and human genetics. The student gains a background that facilitates a greater understanding of recent advances in molecular biology and human inheritance.
Prerequisite: BIO 220 Corequisite: CHE 202 or 220
Course Syllabus
The goal of this course is to provide students with a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cellular processes introduced in BIO 210/220 — the structure, function and specializations of the cell. This will be accomplished through a combination of lecture and laboratory sessions providing both theory and application. The course will include study of subcellular structure and function, gene expression, protein activity, cell regulation and cell-to-cell communication.
Prerequisite: BIO 220, Corequisite: CHE 230
Course Syllabus
Micro-organisms pathogenic to humans: their characteristics, pathogenicity and modes of transmission are studied. Instruction includes a study of the sterile technique and maintenance of the sterile field. Required in selected programs in the Health Sciences; available to other students through Departmental approval.
Prerequisites: BIO 426 and CHE 118, or CHE 121, or departmental approval
Course Syllabus
This two-semester course explores the human body as an integrated, functional complex of systems. Terminology, structure and function of each organ-system, with emphasis on their interrelationships, are explained. Required of students in the health services technologies; available to all other students for elective credit.
Prerequisite for BIO 426 is BIO 425. Two terms required. Prerequisite: CHE 118 or CHE 121, or departmental approval NOTE: BIO 425 and BIO 426 do not meet the science requirements in the liberal arts curriculum.
Course Syllabus
This two-semester course explores the human body as an integrated, functional complex of systems. Terminology, structure and function of each organ-system, with emphasis on their interrelationships, are explained. Required of students in the health services technologies; available to all other students for elective credit.
Prerequisite for BIO 426 is BIO 425. Two terms required. Prerequisite: CHE 118 or CHE 121, or departmental approval NOTE: BIO 425 and BIO 426 do not meet the science requirements in the liberal arts curriculum.
Course Syllabus

Biotechnology (BTE)

This course introduces the student to theory and laboratory practices in biotechnology with emphasis on the impact of biotechnology on daily life, health, ethics and society. The course is designed to impart the skills needed for entry-level jobs or to continue on a career path in biotechnology, by exposing students to a variety of careers, laboratory techniques and social issues in the biotechnology industry.
Prerequisite: BIO 220 and CHE 202
Course Syllabus

Chemistry (CHE)

This course investigates chemical concepts through laboratory experiments on structure, chemical reactions, and energy changes. Experiments will that relate to biological chemistry and environmental measurements will also be included. Concepts relevant to the laboratory experiments will be discussed.
Corequisite: CHE 108
Course Syllabus
This course is designed specifically for the non-science major. It explores the world of atoms and molecules and relates this submicroscope world to the daily life of the student. Topics to be discussed include plastics, foods, the environment, genetics, and drugs.
Course Syllabus
This is a one-semester course designed especially to meet the needs of students in the Health Technology Programs. Topics include modern atomic theory and an introduction to the molecular basis of matter through the study of chemical principles and reactions. Lecture and laboratory are integrally related.
Course Syllabus
This is an introduction to the chemistry of carbon compounds. The lecture emphasizes structure and bonding, reaction mechanisms, synthesis, stereochemistry, and applications to biological chemistry. The laboratory experiments illustrate the lecture topics. Prerequisite: CHE 118, or CHE 121, or departmental approval
Course Syllabus
This course is a two-semester course sequence that introduces principles and concepts of general, organic and biological chemistry. The laboratory will provide experimental applications of these chemical topics. CHE 121-122- Two terms are required. They are liberal arts electives. They are recommended for students intending to transfer to bachelor degree Allied Health Science curricula. CHE 121-122 cannot be granted credit to fulfill degree requirements for Science (A.S.) and Engineering Science (A.S.). CHE 121-122 do not meet the science requirement for the Liberal Arts degree (A.A.).
Course Syllabus
This course is a two-semester course sequence that introduces principles and concepts of general, organic and biological chemistry. The laboratory will provide experimental applications of these chemical topics. CHE 121-122 - terms are required. They are liberal arts electives. They are recommended for students intending to transfer to bachelor degree Allied Health Science curricula. CHE 121-122 cannot be granted credit to fulfill degree requirements for Science (A.S.) and Engineering Science (A.S.). CHE 121-122 do not meet the science requirement for the Liberal Arts degree (A.A.).
Course Syllabus
This course is an introduction to the principles of biochemistry that studies the structure, function, energetics and metabolism of biomolecules. The laboratory emphasizes biochemical techniques. Prerequisite for CHE 120, CHE 122 or departmental approval
Course Syllabus
This is a two-semester course sequence that involves the study of chemical principles including atomic and molecular theories, molecular structure, and reactivity. The laboratory will include experiments illustrating the chemical principles. CHE 201-202 two terms required. Required in A.S. (Science) and A.S. (Engineering Science). Fulfills science requirement for A.A. (Liberal Arts). Prerequisite for CHE 202 is CHE 201
Course Syllabus
This is a two-semester course sequence that involves the study of chemical principles including atomic and molecular theories, molecular structure, and reactivity. The laboratory will include experiments illustrating the chemical principles. CHE 201-202 two terms required. Required in A.S. (Science) and A.S. (Engineering Science). Fulfills science requirement for A.A. (Liberal Arts). Prerequisite for CHE 202 is CHE 201
Course Syllabus
This course discusses the principles of classical and instrumental techniques in analytical chemistry. Laboratory experiments include gravimetric, volumetric and instrumental methods of analysis.
Prerequisite: CHE 202 and MAT 206
Course Syllabus
This two-semester course sequence is the study of the structure and properties of the fundamental classes of organic compounds with emphasis on reactivity, reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, electronic theory, and applications to allied fields. Two terms are required.
Prerequisite for CHE 230 is CHE 202 or 220
Prerequisite for CHE 240 is CHE 230
Course Syllabus
This is a two-semester course sequence that involves the study of chemical principles including atomic and molecular theories, molecular structure, and reactivity. The laboratory will include experiments illustrating the chemical principles. CHE 201-202 two terms required. Required in A.S. (Science) and A.S. (Engineering Science). Fulfills science requirement for A.A. (Liberal Arts).
Prerequisite for CHE 202 is CHE 201
Course Syllabus

Engineering (ESC)

This course provides an introduction to engineering practice through hands-on investigations, computer applications, and design projects in the fields of structures and robotics. All investigations and design projects are performed in groups and presented in oral and/or written form. Computers are used for documentation, data analysis and robot control.
Prerequisites: MAT 206, CHE 201 or CHE 210, PHY 215 or departmental approval
Course Syllabus
This course introduces topics important for engineers. Computer aided analysis techniques are introduced and used for the design and modeling of engineering systems such as electrical circuits, pipelines, signal and image processing, aircraft engines, orbits and trajectories, protein molecules and sewer treatment. Corequisites: MAT 206, CHE 201 or CHE 210, PHY 215 or departmental approval
Course Syllabus
This is a course in fundamental engineering drawing and industrial drafting-room practice. Lettering, orthographic projection, auxiliary views, sessions and conventions, pictorials, threads and fasteners, tolerances, detail drawing dimensioning and electrical drawing; introduction to computer-aided graphics are covered.
Course Syllabus
This is a course in statics and dynamics and designed for engineering students. Among the topics covered are forces, equilibrium, friction, kinematics and dynamics of a particle, work and energy, linear and angular motion, and rotational dynamics of a rigid body. Prerequisites: PHY 225 and MAT 302, or departmental approval
Course Syllabus
This course is a three-dimensional vector treatment of the static equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies. Topics include: equivalent force and coupled systems, static analysis of trusses, frames machines, friction, properties of surfaces and rigid bodies, particle kinematics, path variables, cylindrical coordinates and relative motion. Elements of design are incorporated in the course. Prerequisites: ESC 130, MAT 302 and PHY 225 and SCI 120, or SCI 121, or departmental approval
Course Syllabus
This course is a three-dimensional vector treatment of the kinematics of rigid bodies using various coordinate systems. Topics include: relative motion, particle dynamics, Newton┬┐s laws, energy and mechanical vibrations. Elements of design are incorporated in the course. Prerequisites: ESC 130, ESC 201, PHY 225, Corequisite: MAT 501 or departmental approval
Course Syllabus
This course covers introductory concepts and definitions; Absolute temperature, Work, heat, First Law and applications, Second Law, Carnot Theorem, entropy, thermodynamic state variables and functions, reversibility, irreversibility, ideal gas mixtures, mixtures of vapors and gas, humidity calculations. Corequisites: CHE 201 and PHY 225
Course Syllabus
This course covers circuit elements and their voltage-current relations; Kirchoff's Laws, elementary circuit analysis; continuous signals; differential equations; first order systems and second order systems. Students will simulate circuits on the computer. A laboratory component is integrated into the course.
Prerequisite: PHY 225 and ESC 113, Corequisite: MAT 501 or departmental approval
Course Syllabus
This course includes the analysis and design of cominational and sequential circuits and their applications to digital systems. The use of integrated circuits in the design of digital circuits is illustrated in the laboratory experiments.
Prerequisites: MAT 302, PHY 225, and SCI 120 or SCI 121, or departmental approval
Course Syllabus

Environmental Science(ENV)

Environmental Science is a basic science class designed to incorporate the chemical and biological background needed to understand the current environmental issues facing our society. The topics covered include the basic principles of ecology, pollution, population growth, wildlife management, water resources and quality among others. Fundamental to the course is an understanding of scientific method and its application to dealing with complex environmental issues.
Prerequisites: BIO 210, BIO 220, CHE 201 and CHE 202
Course Syllabus

Geology (GLY)

This course covers fundamental principles of geology encompassing the study of minerals and rocks, geological processes, interpretation of topographic and geological maps and techniques of remote sensing. This is a program elective in Engineering Science and an elective in all other curricula. It does not meet the science requirement for Liberal Arts A.A. degree.
Course Syllabus

Physics (PHY)

This course serves as an introduction to general physics theory, especially for students who are not science oriented. A selected number of basic topics in physics are carefully examined and interpreted. Topics include mechanics, heat and thermodynamics, electromagnetism, optics, atomic and nuclear physics. The relevance of the scientist and his/her work to the lives of non-scientists is continually examined.
Course Syllabus
This course serves as an experimental introduction to general physics, especially for students who are not science oriented. A selected number of basic topics in physics are carefully examined and subjected to experimental verification. The relevance of the scientist and his/her work to the lives of non-scientists is continually examined.
Corequisite: PHY 108
Course Syllabus
This course serves as an introduction to Physics, especially for students who are not science-oriented. A selected number of basic physical ideas are carefully examined and interpreted non-mathematically. The relevance of the scientist and his/her work to the lives of non-scientists is continually examined.
Course Syllabus
This classroom and laboratory two-semester course includes the study of concepts and principles of physics in the areas of mechanics, heat and thermodynamics, sound, electricity and magnetism, light, and atomic physics plus an introduction to quantum physics and relativity theory. Algebra and simple trigonometry are used. Two terms required.
Prerequisite for PHY 220 is PHY 210
Course Syllabus
This is a two-semester course for students in science and engineering. Concepts of calculus are introduced and used when necessary. The lecture and laboratory exercises pertain to mechanics, fluids, heat and thermodynamics, wave motion, sound, electricity, and magnetism, geometric and physical optics, and an introduction to modern physics.
For PHY 215, Co-requisite: MAT 301
 For PHY 225, Prerequisite: PHY 215, MAT 301
NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for both PHY 210 and PHY 215, or PHY 220 and PHY 225.
Course Syllabus
This classroom and laboratory two-semester course includes the study of concepts and principles of physics in the areas of mechanics, heat and thermodynamics, sound, electricity and magnetism, light, and atomic physics plus an introduction to quantum physics and relativity theory. Algebra and simple trigonometry are used. Two terms required.
Prerequisite for PHY 220 is PHY 210
Course Syllabus
This is a two-semester course for students in science and engineering. Concepts of calculus are introduced and used when necessary. The lecture and laboratory exercises pertain to mechanics, fluids, heat and thermodynamics, wave motion, sound, electricity, and magnetism, geometric and physical optics, and an introduction to modern physics.
For PHY 215, Co-requisite: MAT 301
For PHY 225, Prerequisite: PHY 215, MAT 301
NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for both PHY 210 and PHY 215, or PHY 220 and PHY 225.
Course Syllabus
This is an introduction to atomic and nuclear physics, relativity, solid state physics, and elementary particles.
Prerequisite: PHY 225, Corequisite: MAT 501 or departmental approval
Course Syllabus
The course is designed to give the student a fundamentally qualitative understanding of all the physical processes associated with the production, reproduction, and perception of musical sounds. This course may fulfill the physics requirement in the VAT Curriculum.
Course Syllabus

Science (SCI)

This course will introduce the processes involved in research. Students will be designing and performing experiments and analyzing the results. Objectives are: to understand the scientific method, interpret statistics, and appreciate mathematical research. Computers will be used for statistics, graphing, pattern recognition and word processing. Recommended for mathematics and science oriented liberal arts students as a liberal arts elective. Not open to Science or Engineering Science majors. Prerequisite: One year of college science
Course Syllabus
This course teaches a computer language and emphasizes application of programming methods for the sciences and engineering. Numerical methods will be applied to examples gleaned from physics, chemistry, and biology and engineering. Prerequisite: MAT 206
Course Syllabus
This course is similar in scope and assignments to SCI 120 but utilizes the Pascal programming language.
Course Syllabus
This is a study of a typical microprocessor and interfacing techniques. Concepts of electricity and its application to digital circuits are introduced as needed for purposes of control and measurement of analog quantities such as current, voltage, and temperature.
Prerequisite: MAT 206
Course Syllabus
This is an introduction to the fundamental principles of human nutrition. The nutrient composition of various foods is examined as well as the manner in which the nutrients are metabolized and used by the human body.
Prerequisite: One semester of science or departmental approval
Course Syllabus
This course is a study of the interaction of man and his environment. Topics examined include ecology, air and water pollution, pesticides, radioactivity, power generation, noise pollution, waste disposal, population control, food additives, and food contamination. This course is offered as an elective in all curricula.
Prerequisite: One semester of any science
Course Syllabus
This course covers the theory and practice and quantitative method with special attention to instrumentation currently employed such as optical, electro-chemical, chromatographic, and radio-chemical techniques. The physicochemical theory and operating characteristics of the instrumentation are stressed. The laboratory emphasizes measurements of biological and environmental significance.
Prerequisite: 1 year of laboratory science or departmental approval.
Course Syllabus
This course studies alterations of normal physiological processes. Included in the course are the basic principles of pathophysiology as well as application of these principles to specific organ systems.
Prerequisites: BIO 426 and CHE 118 or CHE 121, or permission of the department
Course Syllabus
Fundamental principles and concepts in pharmacology are considered. Particular attention is given to drug action and interaction, and to the effect of drugs and toxic substances in the human organism. This course is required in selected programs in Allied Health Sciences; available to all other students for elective credit. It is recommended that students complete HIT 103, Medical Terminology I, before registering for this course.
Prerequisite: BIO 426 and CHE 118 or CHE 121, or permission of the department
Course Syllabus

Science Department |Office Directory

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The City University of New York

Borough of Manhattan Community College
The City University of New York
199 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007
212-220-8000 | Directory

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