Ilir Disha

Picture of Ilir    Disha


Assistant Professor
Social Sciences, Human Services and Criminal Justice

EMAIL: idisha@bmcc.cuny.edu

Office: N-662

Office Hours: M 02:00-05:00pm

Phone: +1 (212) 220-8000;ext=5332

Resume

Professor Ilir Disha is from Albania. He arrived to the United States via the Diversity Visa Lottery program in 1997.

Professor Disha completed most of his education in Tampa, Florida. He started at Hillsborough County Community College (HCC), from where he earned an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Studies. Afterwards, he transferred to a liberal arts college, at the University of Tampa, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology. Then, continuing with graduate studies, he first completed the Masters of Arts program in Sociology from the University of South Florida (USF) and, later, was accepted as a graduate student in the doctorate program of Sociology at SUNY, Albany. He earned his doctorate degree in 2014 with specialization on immigration and crime.

Professor Disha believes education is important. It helps make us better human beings. He has experience teaching multiple courses in sociology and criminal justice at different educational institutions, ranging from two year colleges to liberal arts and research universities. He has varied interests. His research explores the college experience of criminal justice majors, hate crimes, and immigration-crime links. He enjoys teaching, researching, and guiding students through an important period of life.

Expertise

Crime and Victimization, Hate Crimes, Immigration Studies

Degrees

  • B.S. Psychology, University of Tampa, 2002
  • M.A. Sociology, University of South Florida (USF), 2005
  • Ph.D. Sociology, State University of New York (SUNY) at Albany, 2014

Courses Taught

Research and Projects

  • The Politics of Hate Crimes: The project aims to uncover the effect of politics and regional cultural features on hate crimes.
  • Criminal Justice Work and Students’ Attitudes: This project investigates students’ views on college major and future career if they have someone working in the Criminal Justice field.
  • Criminal Justice Entanglement and Students’ Attitudes: Similar to the above, the project tries to understand how legal entanglements affect students’ choice of college major and career motives.

Publications

  • It’s Personal: The Impact of Victimization on Motivations and Career Interests among Criminal Justice Majors at Diverse Urban Colleges. 2019. Journal of Criminal Justice Education.
  • Different Paths: The Role of Immigrant Assimilation on Neighborhood Crime. 2019. Social Science Quarterly, 100(4): 1129-1153.
  • The Role of Immigrant Enclaves for Latino Residential Inequalities. 2014. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 40(1): 1-20.
  • Historical Events and Spaces of Hate: Hate Crimes against Arabs and Muslims in Post-9/11 America. 2011. Journal of Social Problems, 58(1): 21-46.
  • Nowhere Near the Same: The Neighborhoods of Latino Children. 2010. Book Chapter in Growing Up Hispanic: Health and Development of Children of Immigrants. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute Press.

Honors, Awards and Affiliations

  • 2017. Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC) – PSC-CUNY Research Award, $3,500.
  • 2009. State University of New York (SUNY) at Albany – Student Scholarship.
  • 2005. University of South Florida (USF) – Graduate Student Fellowship.

Additional Information

Work is a priority. Yet, when possible, Professor Disha likes to engage in physical activities. He enjoys walks to the beach and playing recreational soccer with his friends.