Skip to Content

Making an Argument

Understanding Relations and Making Transitions

Transitions are a way to show the relationships between different parts of your paper. Here are some common relationships between ideas, along with words that might be helpful for showing those relationships.



ADDITION

The capital of China is Beijing, and the capital of India is New Delhi.

and, also, both…and, furthermore, too, equally important, further, next, what’s more, in addition, as well as, moreover



CAUSE AND EFFECT

Because China’s population is so large, the Chinese government has reduced the country’s birth rate.

because, so that, resulting in, therefore, since, due to, at last, consequently, accordingly, hence, thus, in response to



SIMILARITY (COMPARISON)

Like China, India has a population of over one billion people.

like, likewise, similarly, in like manner, analogous to, just as



DIFFERENCE (CONTRAST)

China has reduced the country’s birth rate, but India has not been able to slow its population growth.

but, whereas, in contrast, unlike, instead, differently, however, yet, by comparison, on the other hand



QUALIFICATION OR CONCESSION

Although China has the world’s largest population now, India’s population will be the largest by 2013.

although, nonetheless, still, though, yet, despite, sometimes, in part



ILLUSTRATION OR EXAMPLE

China’s geography is highly varied, including frozen mountain ranges and tropical beaches.

including, for example, after all, consider, specifically, such as



PROOF

The success of the China’s policy demonstrates that a government can influence population size.

demonstrates, proves, evidently, indeed, shows, in fact



CHRONOLOGY (THE ORDER OF EVENTS IN TIME)

China enacted the one-child policy after deciding that the population was expanding unsustainably. after, first, second, third, following, afterward, before, formerly,

simultaneously, subsequently, concurrently, now, in the meantime



CONCLUSION OR SUMMARY

In the end, we can see that governments do influence the size of their country’s population.

in the end, on the whole, in short, in closing, to summarize, finally

BMCC Writing Center

Front Desk (General Information)
writingcenter@bmcc.cuny.edu
(212) 220-1384

Franklin Winslow, Director
Fwinslow@bmcc.cuny.edu
(212) 220-8000 x5167

Mailing Address
BMCC Writing Center
Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY
199 Chambers Street, Room S510
New York, NY 10007

Hours of Operation

The BMCC Writing Center will be closed Wednesday, 12/21/2017 – Monday, 1/1/2018. We will reopen on Tuesday, 1/2/2018. Happy Holidays!