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S115
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Course Listings

The Music & Art Department offers courses in the following areas:

ART

This image-based course will introduce graphic design as the foundation upon which effective visual communication is built. Investigation of the elements and principles of graphic design will lead to specific design problems and their solution. The development of ideas and the ability to communicate them effectively will be covered. Discussion of both vector and bitmap-based digital graphic platforms will begin progress toward industry-standard computer proficiency.
This course includes formal analysis of selected works of art: painting, sculpture, and architecture. It is also an approach to art from the perspective of its socio-historical context, primarily in Western Culture.
This course introduces students to basic color and compositional theories. Problems will be derived from these theories to give students a sound grasp of the use of color and design. In addition to being introduced to color compositional theories, students will become involved with color problems which demand the creative application of the principles of organization.
This course provides an introduction to basic color theory and to fundamental elements and principles of two-dimensional design. Through studio exercises, students explore concepts of color theory and develop skills working with traditional drawing, painting and mixed media. Through design projects, students apply learned skills, work with principles of design, and engage in creative problem solving relating theory to practice.
This introduction to art principles and terms includes the study of the plastic arts: nature, content, and form. The meaning of illusion and abstraction, style and the changing concept of reality in art throughout history are explored. Selected paintings, sculpture, and architecture are examined.
This survey course traces the history of graphic design from the origins of graphic imagery and writing systems to contemporary graphic deign. Emphasis will be placed on the development of visual communication and typography, impact of the Industrial Revolution on design, the Modernist era's effect on visual communication, impact of the desktop publishing revolution and the development of contemporary techniques of information design.
This course covers basic drawing problems aimed at the achievement of manual skills in freehand drawing, drawing from objects from nature and conceptual drawings.
Students are introduced to various drawing media and techniques. Rendering problems dealing with gesture, action, proportion, form and anatomical structure are pursued. Charcoal, pencil, conte crayon, ink and wash, marking pen and various papers (cold and hot press, rice, newsprint, and prepared surfaces) are used. Selected readings and attendance at drawing shows in museums and galleries are required. Prerequisite: ART 161 or departmental approval
This introductory course covers a range of basic approaches to drawing and addresses the development of manual skills in freehand drawing, drawing of objects from nature and idea-oriented approaches to drawing. This course will satisfy drawing requirements for transfer within the CUNY system, as well as professional art schools.
This course introduces students to a basic study of representing the human body. Students work from nude models using a variety of techniques and media while investigating the basics of skeletal and muscular anatomy. This course will satisfy drawing requirements for transfer within the CUNY system, as well as professional art schools. Prerequisite: ART 161 or ART166
This course is designed to have the beginning student explore painting techniques, with an introduction to the use of various media. Strong emphasis is placed on formal concerns (figure and object).
This three credit course is designed to have the beginning student explore painting techniques, with an introduction to the use of various media. Strong emphasis is placed on formal concerns (figure and objects). This course will satisfy painting requirements for transfer within the CUNY system as well as professional art schools.
The class introduces students to the basic elements of visual storytelling, including comics. Through class exercises and assignments, students will learn how to create narratives that combine images and text. Exercises are designed to develop both drawing and scripting skills. Techniques learned can be applied to storyboarding for film and animation as well as to creating graphic narratives. Prerequisite: ART 161 or departmental approval
This course introduces students to three-dimensional sculptural form, using both traditional and contemporary materials and methods. Clay and other media are used in hands-on practice as a means of creative expression and for appreciating and understanding the language of sculpture.
This is an introductory studio course exploring three-dimensional sculptural form, using both traditional and contemporary materials and methods. Clay and other media are used in hands-on practice as a means of expression and for understanding the language of sculpture, including focus on the creative process from idea to completion. This course is intended to satisfy basic sculpture requirements for transfer within CUNY, as well as professional art programs.
An analysis is made by exploring the use of the visual elements in modern art. The major movements are discussed in relation to the individual artist¿s expression in terms of changing historical, social, and cultural periods.
This course is an introduction to advertising, visual communication, layout, merchandising and research problems, letter forms and typography. It is directed toward creative and imaginative problem solving. The student learns how to use thumbnail sketches, indication and comprehensive layout for individual advertisements, as well as complete campaign planning for space, television media and direct mail. Trademarks, letterheads and packaging are also covered. The course provides a broad overview of advertising design.
This course will explore type design and its application in visual communication. Students will learn to manipulate type properties to design meaningful and effective graphic communication. The use of industry-standard desktop publishing software will be covered as well as will be applied to a range of typographic solutions. Prerequisite: ART/MMA 100
This course is an introduction to and survey of art produced in Africa, India, Oceania, and Pre-Columbian North America (Indian). Basic modes of primitive art will be presented and assessed in historical relationship to cultures past and present.
This course investigates the history of art produced by indigenous people of Mesoamerica and the Andes region of South America from 2000 BCE to 1535 CE. We will study significant artworks, including mural paintings, sculptures, architecture, and portable objects, in relation to the socio-historical contexts in which they were created. We also will explore the distinctive artistic styles, forms, and aesthetics of Pre-Columbian art along with themes, beliefs, and diverse cultural characteristics associated with them.
This course continues the study of digital imaging as it relates to graphic design. A course philosophy for this class is the introductionof photographic images as a basis for approaching 2D design concepts. During the semester, this course shall cover digital input, editing, archiving and the beginning of the study of digital output. Conceptual and technical digital shooting assignments will be assigned to expand students' skills and support topics covered in class. Reading and writing will focus on the use of technology in propelling digital imaging and design. Prerequisite: ART/MMA 100
For the beginning student, critical and artistic ability are developed by executing problems of two-dimensional design such as color relationships, composition, pattern, line, shape, and texture. Emphasis is placed on exploring aspects of design and techniques as they apply to the student's work.
This course offers a basic introduction to technical, theoretical, and aesthetic aspects of photography. A 35mm camera in working condition is required.
This course builds upon principles and skills learned in Foundations of Digital Design. Students will apply principles underlying effective visual communication to increasingly complex design problems. Projects may include poster design, symbols and logos, editorial design, information design, visual identity and branding and other design systems. Critical analysis of design problems and the creative design process will be emphasized. Students will complete reading and writing assignments in addition to problems in visual communications and design. Prerequisite: ART /MMA 100
This course offers students an introduction to the art of creating photographs. Basic technical, theoretical, and aesthetic aspects inherent to contemporary photography are presented. During the semester, a range of camera techniques, including exporsure, depth of field, shutter speed and composition are investigated. Reading, writing, and oral assignments will reflect on both technical aspects of photography and on contemporary practice. Note: a 35mm SLR camera with fully manual controls is required for this class.
This course is concerned with three-dimensional design problems and is geared to the advanced student who wishes to expand his/her knowledge of formal problems concerned with mass, volume and shape in a variety of materials.Prerequisite: ART 105, 181, 183 or ART 230
This course is a hands-on studio course exploring three-dimensional design problems, geared to the advanced student who wishes to expand his/her knowledge of frmal issues of mass, volume, and shape in a variety of materials. Emphasis is placed on the creative process and problem-solving, moving from idea to revision to completed design. This course is intended to satisfy 3D design requirements for transfer within CUNY, as well as professional art programs. Prerequisite: ART 105, ART 181, ART 183 or ART 230
As an introduction of Far Eastern art, this course traces the evolution of art styles of the countries of Eastern Asia: India, South East Asia, Indonesia, Central Asia, China, Korea, and Japan. Art styles of these countries are discussed separately in chronological order, in relation to those of the other countries. This course encourages appreciation of Asian art by emphasizing the following: (1) analyzing the styles in relation to their historical and social context; (2) understanding the basic elements, techniques, and theories of forms of painting, sculpture, and architecture in comparison with those of Western art.
This course investigates the history and development of Asian Art, including East Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia, from the Neolithic period to the nineteenth century. We will study significant artworks, including paintings, sculpture, and architecture, in relation to the socio-historical contexts in which they were created. We also will explore distinctive artistic styles, forms, and aesthetics of Asian art along with themes, beliefs, and diverse cultural characteristics associated with them.
An extension of ART 161, this course places emphasis on the human figure, with concentrated attention on formal concerns of design and composition. Prerequisite: ART 161 or departmental approval
This course, a continuation of ART 166, emphasizes formal drawing concerns, such as design, composition, and the introduction of a variety of new media. Advanced projects include still-life, landscape, perspective, portraiture and rendering the human figure. This course will satisfy drawing requirements for transfer within the CUNY system, as well as professional art schools. Prerequisite: ART 161, ART 166 or permission of the department
This advanced life drawing course is a continuation of ART 168. It continues the investigation of drawing the human figure with increased technical ability, exploring historical techniques and the use of more complex poses. This course will satisfy drawing requirements for transfer within the CUNY system, as well as professional art schools.
Prerequisite: ART 164 or ART 168
This course is an intermediate study of painting techniques during which students work in mixed media. Strong emphasis is placed on formal concerns (figure and object). Prerequisite: ART 171, or ART 230, or ART 105, or permission of department
This course, geared toward individual study, is an extension of ART 181. The use of materials for specific creative expression of the sculptor: modeling, carving, and metal working are explored. Prerequisite: ART 181 or departmental approval
This course focuses on advanced problems in advertising for print. The refinement of skills will be emphasized for making comprehensive layouts. Selected studio problems in space advertisement, annual reports, posters, book jackets, and record albums are presented. Prerequisite: ART 214 or departmental approval
This course covers two topics essential for students who intend on pursuing careers in graphic design: prepress production and portfolio design. Students will learn the art and science of preparing and optimizing graphic files for print on commercial offset lithography printers as well as on personal inkjet printers. This course will also guide students through the creation of a cohesive design portfolio, showcasing their creative and technical skills. Prerequisite: ART 100 and two of the following: ART 215, ART 225, ART 235
This course is presented as a more technical and professional approach to various photographic disciplines. Advanced procedures in "full-phase" darkroom, the operation of various camera formats and the uses of natural and studio lighting will be covered. Prior knowledge of basic photographic principles is required of each student. Prerequisite: ART 234 or permission of department.
This course further develops students' understanding and expertise in using a hand-held camera as an image-making tool. During the semester, we shall investigate a range of camera techniques, and approaches to specific topics allowing students to explore the canon of photography. The course will explore light and film characteristics utilizing both color slide film and digital capture. Readings will center on photography's recent history and forays into critical theory. A research project and paper, along with a comprehensive oral presentation will centre on contemporary photography.
Prerequisite: ART 234, ART236 or departmental approval
This course deals with specific design problems through the development of ideas and the ability to communicate them effectively. Corporate identification dealing both with the concept and realization of that concept through final presentation will include color, composition and structure, symbology, typography and production.
This course is geared toward individual study and the concerns of an advanced painting and drawing student. Prerequisite: ART 271 or departmental approval
This course is geared toward individual study and the concerns of the advanced sculpture student. Prerequisite: ART 281 or departmental approval
This is a survey course examining the function and form of African art in its past and present relationships to African cultures. The influence of African art forms on Western art is studied. Lectures, slides and visits to museums and galleries are included.
The aesthetic, cultural, and social contexts of African-American art are studied. Comparative studies of art created by Haitian and African-American artists are included in the course.

MUSIC

This is a preparatory course in rudiments designed for the layman. A study of notation, rhythm, scales and keys, intervals, and chord structures.
Principles of Music is an introductory course in which musical elements, structures and styles are studied. Development of analytic abilities will be emphasized through consideration of major musical works by diverse composers from different eras of the Western Classical tradition. A wide variety of types and forms of music literature will be studied, including symphony, concerto, song, opera, etc. Students will attend a live musical performance. Credit will be granted for MUS 102 or MUS 103, but not both.
An introduction to the music of the Western world and its cultures through a variety of listening experiences. The course will emphasize the place of music in Western Society, as well as influences by and on other cultures. Selected musical works, most dating back from the 16th century through the present, are the subject of exploration.
This is an introductory level class for the music major, the education major, or the layperson. Students will learn to read music, play a keyboard instrument, sight-sing and take dictation. This course is not open to students who have completed MUS 101, MUS 113 or MUS 140.
The course is designed to encourage critical listening by bringing the student into direct contact with music of Western and non-Western cultures. It stresses the elements of music¿rhythm, melody, harmony, texture, tone, color¿by studying and analyzing their juxtapositions, and their total effect on musical forms and styles of the world. Musical illustrations are analyzed not only in musical terms but in relation to important historical, geographical, and ethnological factors.
This course covers the history of Black music in the United States from slavery to present, including a thorough investigation of African backgrounds of the music of slavery, the blues, jazz, gospel, rhythm and blues, as well as Black music in Western art forms. Extensive listening and attendance at live musical performances are required.
The ability to listen to music intelligently and to recognize specific styles, forms, and idioms are developed in this course. Consideration is given to musical aspects of the historical eras from the early Christian period to the present. Students are required to attend concerts and do assigned reading and listening.
This course is an introduction to essentials in four voice part-writing, voice leading, composing a soprano line to a given bass, and harmonizing a given soprano in 17th and 18th century chorale style. There will be some analysis of Bach chorales.
Sight singing, ear training, rhythmic reading, and dictation are coordinated with MUS 112 and MUS 212. Prerequisite for MUS 113: MUS 101 or departmental approval Prerequisite for MUS 213: MUS 105, MUS 113 or departmental approval
This course is designed to introduce students to the relationships between music and physical movement, with special emphasis being placed on rhythm as it relates to music and movement in dance. In addition, the study of rhythmic notation, musical forms, and the preparation of original rhythmic scores are included.
Students learn to play the clarinet or other woodwind instruments. Attention is given to methods of group instruction used in the public schools.
Students learn to play violin or other stringed instruments. Attention is given to methods of group instruction used in the public schools.
Students learn to play a brass instrument. Attention is given to methods of group instruction used in the public schools.
Students learn to play percussion instruments. Attention is given to methods of group instruction used in the public schools.
Designed for study of the piano as secondary instrument, the course includes acquaintance with the keyboard, scales, chords, sight reading, transposition and elementary piano repertoire.
Designed for study of the piano as secondary instrument, the course includes acquaintance with the keyboard, scales, chords, sight reading, transposition and elementary piano repertoire.
Pre-Requisite: MUS105 and MUS140 or DEPT. PERMIT
This course introduces voice students to the basic principles of voice production and prepares prospective teachers for proper handling of young voices. The fundamentals of correct voice production are studied, including breathing, breath control, and elementary study of vowel sounds and consonants. Elementary songs, poise, posture and stage presence are presented from the point of view of the student's own voice to prepare him/her to teach voice classes.
This course introduces voice students to the basic principles of voice production and prepares prospective teachers for proper handling of young voices. The fundamentals of correct voice production are studied, including breathing, breath control, and elementary study of vowel sounds and consonants. Elementary songs, poise, posture and stage presence are presented from the point of view of the student's own voice to prepare him/her to teach voice classes.
Pre-Requisite: MUS160
The first term teaches students to play folk songs in the keys of C and G major. In the second term, strums, rhythms and fundamental chords in all keys are presented. The course includes modern choral accompaniments for simple popular, rock and jazz songs played in classroom, camp and playground settings. Students must supply their own instruments.
The first term teaches students to play folk songs in the keys of C and G major. In the second term, strums, rhythms, and fundamental chords in all keys are presented. The course includes modern choral accompaniments for simple popular, rock, and jazz songs played in classroom, camp and playground settings. Students must supply their own instruments.
This is a course in part-writing, using triads and diatonic seventh chords, with inversions and non-harmonic tones. The course includes study of short musical forms, analysis and composition of short examples.
Pre-Requisite: MUS112
The course is designed to encourage critical listening by bringing the student into direct contact with music of Western and non-Western cultures. It stresses the elements of music-rhythm, melody, harmony, texture, tone, color-by studying and analyzing their juxtapositions, and their total effect on musical forms and styles of the world. Musical illustrations are analyzed not only in musical terms but in relation to important historical, geographical and ethnological factors.
This course will introduce students to the basics of using a computer for music: musical notation technology, MIDI technology, digital audio technology and recording studio techniques.
MUS 105 or instructor's approval
This course covers the history of Black music in the United States from slavery to present, including a thorough investigation of African backgrounds of the music of slavery, the blues, jazz, gospel, rhythm and blues, as well as Black music in Western art forms. Extensive listening and attendance at live musical performances are required.
Continuation of MUS 140 and MUS 150.
This course is designed to familiarize the student, through performance, with small group and big band jazz techniques. These include improvisational concepts, chord progressions, interpretation, conception, phrasing, harmonic awareness, dynamic sensitivity, rhythmic and melodic development, and phrase construction.
This course is designed to familiarize the student, through performance, with small group and big band jazz techniques. These include improvisational concepts, chord progressions, interpretation, conception, phrasing, harmonic awareness, dynamic sensitivity, rhythmic and melodic development, and phrase construction.
Pre-Requisite: MUS301
Continuation of MUS 301 and MUS 302.
Continuation of MUS 301 and MUS 302.
The course includes the study, preparation, and performance of representative works of the standard, contemporary, and musical theater orchestral literature.
The course includes the study, preparation, and performance of representative works of the standard, contemporary, and musical theater orchestral literature.
Continuation of MUS 305 and MUS 306.
Continuation of MUS 305 and MUS 306.
Chromatic harmony, including altered chords, secondary dominant, the dominant ninth and dominant thirteenth, modulation, analysis and short original compositions are studied.
Continuation of MUS 113 and MUS 213.
Beginning with fundamentals and continuing through large ensemble arranging, the course includes composing for various ensemble combinations. Contemporary techniques such as those of Stockhausen, Ornette Coleman, Penderecki, Persichetti, etc., are explored. Prerequisite: MUS 212 or departmental approval
Continuation of MUS 351.
Students are involved in the performance of standard and contemporary choral literature for mixed voices. In addition to choral training, the course includes performances at concerts, college ceremonies and functions.
Chromatic harmony, including altered chords, secondary dominant, the dominant ninth and dominant thirteenth, modulation, analysis and short original compositions are studied.
Students are involved in the performance of standard and contemporary choral literature for mixed voices. In addition to choral training, the course includes performances at concerts, college ceremonies and functions.
Continuation of MUS 410 and MUS 420
Continuation of MUS 410 and MUS 420
The instrumental ensemble is designed to develop the performance capability and technique of students who play a musical instrument. The repertoire is selected for both personal development and for public performances at college functions and concerts.
The instrumental ensemble is designed to develop the performance capability and technique of students who play a musical instrument. The repertoire is selected for both personal development and for public performances at college functions and concerts.
Continuation of MUS 510 and MUS 520.
Continuation of MUS 510 and MUS 520.
Beginning with scales and arpeggios, this is a study of standard repertoire with emphasis on stylistic interpretation. In addition the student develops sight-reading skills. Entry into private instruction must be approved by the chairperson following an audition.
Beginning with scales and arpeggios, this is a study of standard repertoire with emphasis on stylistic interpretation. In addition the student develops sight-reading skills.
This course studies the history and development of Puerto Rican music, beginning with an analysis of the role of music in each of the three cultures (Arawak, Spanish, and West African) that comprise the Puerto Rican society. The characteristics of each one of these musics, the relationship between music and social organization, and the presence of these characteristics in the music of the Colonial period are examined. The growth of the Puerto Rican society during the 18th and 19th centuries and its resulting social divisions are studied as the groundwork to analyze the relation between music and social class. The marked influence of West African rhythms in the contemporary music of the Caribbean and the connection between music and national identity are also studied. Lectures are supplemented with tapes, phonograph records, and live performances.
Continuation of MUS 510 AND MUS 520

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