Hours & Contact Info

Monday-Friday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
F1130A
Tel: 212-220-1464
Fax: 212-220-1285

Course Listings

The Music & Art Department offers courses in the following areas:

ART

This course will introduce digital art image making, editing and design techniques as a foundation upon which an effective visual language is built. Beginning with an investigation of the elements and principles of digital design, students will discover a broad range of visual ideas, concepts and techniques to use in creating images. Expressing, evaluating and communicating ideas with visual images is a primary focus of this course. During the semester, students will use imaging and design software consistent with that in use by artists and other visual professions as a beginning step towards professional-standard computer proficiency.
This introduction to art history includes the study of painting, sculpture, architecture and other media by surveying the Paleolithic period through the Late Gothic period using a global approach. This exploration of art and architecture in terms of history, social context, meaning and style will promote a general understanding of the development of art and style in different cultures and the effects of cultural exchange on the arts. Discussions of techniques, media, composition, and figure representation will provide an understanding of key concepts in the arts.
Using a global approach, this introduction to art history includes the study of painting, sculpture, architecture and other media by surveying the Renaissance through the start of the twentieth century. The exploration of techniques, media, composition, and figure representation will provide an understanding of key concepts in the arts with additional focus on the historical and social context, which developed the meaning and changing styles in different cultures as well as the effects of cultural exchange through the arts.
This introduction to Modern and Contemporary art history includes the study of painting, sculpture, architecture and other media by surveying the development and evolution of artistic styles using a global approach. Emphasis will be placed on groundbreaking artistic movements in context to their historical framework. Students will learn the importance of innovative practices, techniques and new avenues of exploration, by understanding the socio-political and cultural events that influenced artists to create groundbreaking works, which have led the way to Contemporary Art.
This course provides an introduction to basic color theory and to fundamental elements and principles of two-dimensional design. Through studio exercises, students explore concepts of color theory and develop skills working with traditional drawing, painting and mixed media. Through design projects, students apply learned skills, work with principles of design, and engage in creative problem solving relating theory to practice.
This introduction to art principles and terms includes the study of the plastic arts: nature, content, and form. The meaning of illusion and abstraction, style and the changing concept of reality in art throughout history are explored. Selected paintings, sculpture, and architecture are examined.
This survey course traces the history of graphic design from the origins of graphic imagery and writing systems to contemporary graphic deign. Emphasis will be placed on the development of visual communication and typography, impact of the Industrial Revolution on design, the Modernist era's effect on visual communication, impact of the desktop publishing revolution and the development of contemporary techniques of information design.
This course covers basic drawing problems aimed at the achievement of manual skills in freehand drawing, drawing from objects from nature and conceptual drawings.
This introductory course covers a range of basic approaches to drawing and addresses the development of manual skills in freehand drawing, drawing of objects from nature and idea-oriented approaches to drawing. This course will satisfy drawing requirements for transfer within the CUNY system, as well as professional art schools.
This course introduces students to a basic study of representing the human body. Students work from nude models using a variety of techniques and media while investigating the basics of skeletal and muscular anatomy. This course will satisfy drawing requirements for transfer within the CUNY system, as well as professional art schools. Prerequisite: ART 161 or ART166
This three credit course is designed to have the beginning student explore painting techniques, with an introduction to the use of various media. Strong emphasis is placed on formal concerns (figure and objects). This course will satisfy painting requirements for transfer within the CUNY system as well as professional art schools.
This introductory course covers a range of techniques and concepts as they concern visual storytelling. Through class exercises and assignments, students will earn to create narratives that effectively combine images and text while developing drawing, design and script writing skills. Outcomes can be applied to working in film, animation, and other two-dimensional or three-dimensional graphic narratives. Through lectures, research and production, students will expand their visual vocabulary while broadening the influences on their work.
Prerequisite: ART 161 or ART 166 or departmental permission
This is an introductory studio course exploring three-dimensional sculptural form, using both traditional and contemporary materials and methods. Clay and other media are used in hands-on practice as a means of expression and for understanding the language of sculpture, including focus on the creative process from idea to completion. This course is intended to satisfy basic sculpture requirements for transfer within CUNY, as well as professional art programs.
This course will use digital imaging principles as an essential part of photographic editing. Fundamental digital imaging skills will include input, editing, archiving and output as part of the creative process. A range of approaches to producing, processing and printing digital images will be explored as they relate to current practices.
Prequisites: ART 101 or Permission of the Department
This course will explore type design and its application in visual communication. Students will learn to manipulate type properties to design meaningful and effective graphic communication. The use of industry-standard desktop publishing software will be covered as well as will be applied to a range of typographic solutions. Prerequisite: ART/MMA 100
This course investigates the history of art produced by indigenous people of Mesoamerica and the Andes region of South America from 2000 BCE to 1535 CE. We will study significant artworks, including mural paintings, sculptures, architecture, and portable objects, in relation to the socio-historical contexts in which they were created. We also will explore the distinctive artistic styles, forms, and aesthetics of Pre-Columbian art along with themes, beliefs, and diverse cultural characteristics associated with them.
This course continues the study of digital imaging as it relates to graphic design. A course philosophy for this class is the introductionof photographic images as a basis for approaching 2D design concepts. During the semester, this course shall cover digital input, editing, archiving and the beginning of the study of digital output. Conceptual and technical digital shooting assignments will be assigned to expand students' skills and support topics covered in class. Reading and writing will focus on the use of technology in propelling digital imaging and design. Prerequisite: ART/MMA 100
For the beginning student, critical and artistic ability are developed by executing problems of two-dimensional design such as color relationships, composition, pattern, line, shape, and texture. Emphasis is placed on exploring aspects of design and techniques as they apply to the student's work.
This course builds upon principles and skills learned in Foundations of Digital Design. Students will apply principles underlying effective visual communication to increasingly complex design problems. Projects may include poster design, symbols and logos, editorial design, information design, visual identity and branding and other design systems. Critical analysis of design problems and the creative design process will be emphasized. Students will complete reading and writing assignments in addition to problems in visual communications and design. Prerequisite: ART /MMA 100
This course offers students an introduction to the art of creating photographs. Basic technical, theoretical, and aesthetic aspects inherent to contemporary photography are presented. During the semester, a range of camera techniques, including exporsure, depth of field, shutter speed and composition are investigated. Reading, writing, and oral assignments will reflect on both technical aspects of photography and on contemporary practice. Note: a 35mm SLR camera with fully manual controls is required for this class.
This course is a hands-on studio course exploring three-dimensional design problems, geared to the advanced student who wishes to expand his/her knowledge of frmal issues of mass, volume, and shape in a variety of materials. Emphasis is placed on the creative process and problem-solving, moving from idea to revision to completed design. This course is intended to satisfy 3D design requirements for transfer within CUNY, as well as professional art programs. Prerequisite: ART 101, ART 107 or ART 183
This course investigates the history and development of Asian Art, including East Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia, from the Neolithic period to the nineteenth century. We will study significant artworks, including paintings, sculpture, and architecture, in relation to the socio-historical contexts in which they were created. We also will explore distinctive artistic styles, forms, and aesthetics of Asian art along with themes, beliefs, and diverse cultural characteristics associated with them.
This course, a continuation of ART 166, emphasizes formal drawing concerns, such as design, composition, and the introduction of a variety of new media. Advanced projects include still-life, landscape, perspective, portraiture and rendering the human figure. This course will satisfy drawing requirements for transfer within the CUNY system, as well as professional art schools. Prerequisite: ART 161, ART 166 or permission of the department
This advanced life drawing course is a continuation of ART 168. It continues the investigation of drawing the human figure with increased technical ability, exploring historical techniques and the use of more complex poses. This course will satisfy drawing requirements for transfer within the CUNY system, as well as professional art schools.
Prerequisite: ART 164 or ART 168
This course continues the development of technical, analytical, and perceptual skills and enhances the advancement of an individual approach to painting. The course will satisfy studio requirements for transfer within the CUNY system as well as professional art schools.
Prerequisite: ART 171 or ART 174
This course is designed to extend the skills and abilities of students who can already combine images and text through drawings, designs and script writing. Students will create several theme-based assignments as if working professionally in the two-dimensional or three-dimensional graphic narrative field. In-class project development will include the sharing of multiple-scenario outcomes. Through lectures, research, and production, students will expand their visual vocabulary while broadening the variety of influences of their own work.
Prerequisite: ART 176 or departmental permission
This intermediate sculpture course is an extension of ART 183. Directed toward individual study, students continue to explore their interest in sculpture, including modeling, carving, and assemblage in clay, plaster, and mixed media. In addition, students learn the casting process, and practice visual and verbal analysis through writing and critiques. This course is intended to satisfy intermediate sculpture requirements for transfer within CUNY as well as to professional art programs.
Prerequisite: ART 181, ART 183 or departmental approval
This course is designed as a survey of Medieval Europe after the fall of the Roman Empire through the Gothic Period and the beginnings of the Renaissance. A study of the artistic and architectural traditions borrowed from antiquity and the new developments of the periods discussed will be conducted to develop an understanding of the broader context of the migrating peoples and the Christian traditions spreading throughout the regions as Modern Europe is born.
Prerequisite: ENG 101 and (ART 102 or ART 104)
This course provides an overview of the Fifteenth through Seventeenth Centuries in Europe, with a focus on the discoveries made in the arts and beyond. In an age when patrons and artists considered themselves intellectuals and explorers, this course will examine individual artists, artworks, materials and techniques, and the ever-growing need to "create" something new. Students will conduct their own exploration of the contextual topics surrounding the arts, the lasting influences, and the influences on and by other cultures transmitted through trade and travel.
Prerequisite: ENG 101 and (ART 102 or ART 104)
This course is designed as a survey of the Greco-Roman traditions in the art and architecture of ancient Greece and Rome. Major works, themes, techniques and artists will be presented to better understand the influences on the arts from previous periods and diverse cultures, as well as the continuing influences of antiquity through the ages. The course will also focus on the historical and cultural issues that provide context for the works of art including philosophical, social, religious, political and economic influences.
Prerequisite: ENG 101 and (ART 102 or ART 104)
The survey of Eighteen-and Nineteenth-Century Art traces the development of the visual arts throughout the Age of Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution from c. 1700 to 1900 in Europe and North America. Emphasis will be placed on the chronological development of style from the Baroque, to the Rococo, Neo-Classical, Romantic, Realist, and Impressionist Movements, as well as the development of photography, and the foundations laid for the arts and artists of the 20th century.
Prerequisites: ENG 101 and ART 102 or ART 104
This course introduces students to concepts and approaches in shooting still photographs for use in visual communication including photojournalism, documentary, and personal narrative. The assignments explore a range of techniques and ideas as they relate to the specific photographic genres, including light and use of lighting, narrative, and the ethics of fact vs. fiction. Through lectures, research and production of new work, students will expand their understanding of these genres in photography.
Prerequisite: ART 236 or departmental permission
This course covers advanced digital image retouching and editing. Students learn digital editing and retouching skills at a professional level. Issues relating to these skills include color calibration and retouching ethics. Through introduction to new material, research, and the production of new images, students will expand their technical and visual skills relating to retouching photographic images.
Prerequisite: ART 236 and ART 100 (or departmental approval
This course covers two topics essential for students who intend on pursuing careers in graphic design: prepress production and portfolio design. Students will learn the art and science of preparing and optimizing graphic files for print on commercial offset lithography printers as well as on personal inkjet printers. This course will also guide students through the creation of a cohesive design portfolio, showcasing their creative and technical skills. Prerequisite: ART 100 and two of the following: ART 215, ART 225, ART 235
This course further develops students' understanding and expertise in using a hand-held camera as an image-making tool. During the semester, we shall investigate a range of camera techniques, and approaches to specific topics allowing students to explore the canon of photography. The course will explore light and film characteristics utilizing both color slide film and digital capture. Readings will center on photography's recent history and forays into critical theory. A research project and paper, along with a comprehensive oral presentation will centre on contemporary photography.
Prerequisite: ART 234, ART236 or departmental approval
This course introduces students to working with studio lighting as in a professional graphic studio. The assignments will introduce a range of lighting systems including tungsten, studio and portable flash, natural light, and mixed sources. Artistic and technical problems associated with portraiture, still life, product and fine art photography will be addressed. Hand-held meters, flash meters, lighting accessories, filters, and an introduction to medium and large format cameras will be covered during the semester. Through lectures, research and production of new work, students will expand their understanding of light and lighting while broadening the influences on their work.
Prerequisite: ART 236 or Permission of the Department
This introductory course covers digital photography printing including basic retouching and editing. Students will learn the importance of digital workflow, and how it pertains to professional post-production scenarios. Beginning with downloading images from cameras or capture devices, students will learn to use appropriate naming and filing conventions, meta data, basic editing and retouching images, archiving, and digital printing. Through introduction to new material, research, and printing new images, students will expand their technical and visual skills beyond the initial image.
Prerequisite: ART 101 and ART 236 or Departmental Permission
Painting III, ART 374, continues the development of technical, analytical and perceptual skills necessary to create a painting. The course enhances the development of an individualized approach to image making and the development of the student as an artist. This class emphasizes independent projects that give the student a chance to develop a body of personal work, and emphasizes the development of a portfolio. ART 374 is designed to transfer within the CUNY system, as well as professional art schools.
Prerequisite: ART 274 or instructor approval
This advanced sculpture course is an extension of ART 283. Through in-depth projects, students refine their skills in sculpture, with a focus on larger scale and installations using contemporary materials and techniques. In addition, students learn the use of specialized tools, and practice visual and verbal analysis through writing and critiques. This course is intended to satisfy advanced sculpture requirements for transfer within CUNY as well as to professional art programs.
Prerequisite: ART 281, ART 283, or departmental approval
This capstone course for all Studio Art Majors covers a range of topics relating to the business of being an artist and pursuing a career in the arts. Students will develop their portfolios for transfer to a senior college or to begin their professional careers. During the semester, students will create a professional online presence, write an artist statement, generate a five-year plan for their work, research writing strategies for grants and residencies, prepare and document their work to enter shows. In addition, students will explore a range of options in their career paths through guest lectures, gallery and museum visits. Students will prepare, select and hang their work in the annual student show.
Prerequisite: Departmental permission
This capstone course for all Studio Art Majors covers a range of topics relating to the business of being an artist and pursuing a career in the arts. Students will develop their portfolios for transfer to a senior college or to begin their professional careers. During the semester, students will create a professional online presence, write an artist statement, generate a five-year plan for their work, research writing strategies for grants and residencies, prepare and document their work to enter shows. In addition, students will explore a range of options in their career paths through guest lectures, gallery and museum visits. Students will prepare, select and hang their work in the annual student show.
Prerequisite: Departmental permission
This is a survey course examining the function and form of African art in its past and present relationships to African cultures. The influence of African art forms on Western art is studied. Lectures, slides and visits to museums and galleries are included.
The aesthetic, cultural, and social contexts of African-American art are studied. Comparative studies of art created by Haitian and African-American artists are included in the course.

MUSIC

This is a preparatory course in rudiments designed for the layman. A study of notation, rhythm, scales and keys, intervals, and chord structures.
Principles of Music is an introductory course in which musical elements, structures and styles are studied. Development of analytic abilities will be emphasized through consideration of major musical works by diverse composers from different eras of the Western Classical tradition. A wide variety of types and forms of music literature will be studied, including symphony, concerto, song, opera, etc. Students will attend a live musical performance. Credit will be granted for MUS 102 or MUS 103, but not both.
An introduction to the music of the Western world and its cultures through a variety of listening experiences. The course will emphasize the place of music in Western Society as well as influences by and on other cultures. Selected musical works, most dating from the 16th century through the present, are the subject of exploration. Credit will be granted for MUS102 or MUS103 but not both.
This introductory survey explores the musical and social histories of jazz from its American origins to its global present. Its focus encompasses jazz's development in the United States, its impact around the world, and the contributions of musicians who have shaped its creative and cultural significance. Requiring no prior knowledge of music, students will develop the analytical listening skills required to identify both the music's defining stylistic features and its leading figures. In addition to the music itself this course will examine the meanings jazz has acquired in its diverse geographical, social and historical contexts.
This is an introductory level course in music fundamentals. Students will learn music notation, basic keyboard skills and basic music theory.
This introductory survey course explores the world’s music cultures with emphases on traditional and popular music styles. Ranging from local ritual musical practices to global commercial hip hop, this course considers the world’s music in relation to broad historical, cultural, and social contexts. Requiring no prior knowledge of music, students will become familiar with basic principles of musical organization as well as the culturally specific ways in which people engage them. Through guided listening, assigned readings, critical writings, and focused discussion this course will cultivate an understanding of and appreciation for the world’s musical and cultural diversity by examining the important link between music and the society that produces it.
The ability to listen to music intelligently and to recognize specific styles, forms, and idioms are developed in this course. Consideration is given to musical aspects of the historical eras from the early Christian period to the present. Students are required to attend concerts and do assigned reading and listening.
This course is an introduction to essentials in four voice part-writing, voice leading, composing a soprano line to a given bass, and harmonizing a given soprano in 17th and 18th century chorale style. There will be some analysis of Bach chorales.
Sight singing, ear training, rhythmic reading, and dictation are coordinated with MUS 112 and MUS 212. Prerequisite for MUS 113: MUS 101 or departmental approval Prerequisite for MUS 213: MUS 105, MUS 113 or departmental approval
This course will prepare future elementary school teachers to bring music to the classroom. Elementary level vocal music will be studied with an emphasis on singing, conducting, and choreographing. The first several weeks will be devoted to gaining an understanding of rhythmic notation through written work and score study. An understanding of time signatures and meter will be emphasized through classroom and homework. Subsequent lessons will focus on pitch and reading melodies. An understanding of basic musical forms such as binary and ternary will be gained with consideration given to body movement. Each student will prepare a sample lesson plan for teaching movement in a simple choral piece and teach it to the class. Discussion of standard public school requirements for lesson planning will be included.
This course is the first level of a three-semester sequence of music theory courses that focuses on the analysis of fundamental musical materials and stylistic comprehension of music, primarily of the 18th century.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 105 or by permission of the department
This course is the first level of a four-semester sequence in aural skills. Students will develop skills in sight-singing as well as rhythmic, harmonic, and melodic dictation.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 105 or by permission of the department
This course is the first level of a four-semester sequence of keyboard workshop. Students will develop piano keyboard skills through technical exercises, harmonization exercises, scales and arpeggios, harmonic progressions, sight-reading, transposition, improvisation, score-reading, accompanying, and keyboard ensemble work.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 105 or by permission of the department
This course is open to all students and designed to teach beginning students how to play a woodwind instrument. Instruction is given for flutes, clarinets, saxophones, and other instruments. This course does not fulfill any requirement for the music major degrees.
This course introduces music students to the basic principles of playing woodwind instruments and prepares prospective teachers to work with beginning woodwind players. Students will develop beginning level performance proficiency and acquire pedagogical understanding of advanced techniques. Attention is given to methods of group instruction used in K-12.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 105 or by permission of the department
This course is open to all students and introduces beginning level proficiency on the violin, viola, cello or double bass. Students will develop basic note reading skills and will perform basic tunes and exercises to demonstrate tone production and intonation. This course does not fulfill any requirement for the music major degrees.
This course introduces music students to the basic principles of violin and viola playing and prepares prospective teachers to work with beginning string players. Students will develop beginning level performance proficiency, and acquire pedagogical understanding of advanced techniques. Attention is given to methods of group instruction used in K-12.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 105 or by permission of the department
This course introduces music students to the basic principles of cello and string bass playing and prepares prospective teachers to work with beginning string players. Students will develop beginning level performance proficiency, and acquire pedagogical understanding of advanced techniques. Attention is given to methods of group instruction used in K-12.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 105 or by permission of the department
This course is open to all students and designed to teach beginning students how to play a brass instrument. The class introduces basic brass technique, reading notation and transposition and simple repertoire. The first half of the class will focus on trumpet; horn and low brass will be introduced in the second half. This course does not fulfill any requirement for the music major degrees.
This course introduces music students to the basic principles of playing brass instruments and prepares prospective teachers to work with beginning brass players. Students will develop beginning level performance proficiency and acquire pedagogical understanding of advanced techniques. Attention is given to methods of group instruction used in K-12.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 105 or by permission of the department
This course is open to all students and designed to acquaint beginning students with the world of percussion. Students will gain basic music reading skills as well as basic percussion techniques on a variety of percussion instruments. This course does not fulfill any requirement for the music major degrees.
This course introduces music students to the basic principles of playing percussion instruments and prepares prospective teachers to work with beginning percussionists. Students will develop beginning level performance proficiency and acquire pedagogical understanding of advanced techniques. Attention is given to methods of group instruction used in K-12.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 105 or by permission of the department
Designed for study of the piano as secondary instrument, the course includes acquaintance with the keyboard, scales, chords, sight reading, transposition and elementary piano repertoire.
Designed for study of the piano as secondary instrument, the course includes acquaintance with the keyboard, scales, chords, sight reading, transposition and elementary piano repertoire.
Pre-Requisite: MUS105 and MUS140 or DEPT. PERMIT
This course is open to all students and first level of a two-semester sequence in solo singing. Students will learn basic principles of voice production including breathing and singing diction. Elementary songs, poise, posture, and stage presence are addressed. This course does not fulfill any requirement for the music major degrees.
This course introduces music students to the basic principles of singing and prepares prospective teachers to work with beginning singers. Students will develop beginning level performance proficiency and acquire pedagogical understanding of advanced techniques. Attention is given to methods of group instruction used in K-12.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 105 or by permission of the department.
This course is open to all students and the first level of a four -semester sequence in choral singing. Students will learn, rehearse and perform standard choral literature. Diverse works are explored, from the great works of the past to the present day. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester. This course does not fulfill any requirement for the music major degrees.
This course is open to all students and the second level of a four -semester sequence in choral singing. Students will learn, rehearse and perform standard choral literature. Diverse works are explored, from the great works of the past to the present day. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester. This course does not fulfill any requirement for the music major degrees.
Prerequisite: MUS 165
This course is open to all students and the third level of a four -semester sequence in choral singing. Students will learn, rehearse and perform standard choral literature. Diverse works are explored, from the great works of the past to the present day. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester. Students at this level will be expected to take leadership responsibilities in the ensemble. This course does not fulfill any requirement for the music major degrees.
Prerequisite: MUS 166
This course is open to all students and the fourth level of a four -semester sequence in choral singing. Students will learn, rehearse and perform standard choral literature. Diverse works are explored, from the great works of the past to the present day. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester.
Prerequisite: MUS 167
This course is open to all students and the second level of a two-semester sequence in solo singing. Students will learn basic principles of voice production including breathing and singing diction. Elementary songs, poise, posture, and stage presence are addressed. This course does not fulfill any requirement for the music major degrees.
Prerequisite: MUS160
This course is open to all students and the first level of a two-semester sequence in guitar playing. Students will learn guitar repertoire in a variety of styles, including modern chordal accompaniments for simple popular, rock and jazz songs. Fundamentals such as tuning the instrument, open position chords, technique (finger style and plectrum), theory and notation (music notation and tabulature), alternate tunings, and basic aural recognition (scales and chords) will also be covered. This course does not fulfill any requirement for the music major degrees.
This course introduces music students to the basic principles of guitar playing, and prepares prospective teachers to work with beginning guitar players. Students will develop beginning level performance proficiency, and acquire pedagogical understanding of advanced techniques. Attention is given to methods of group instruction used in K-12.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 105 or by permission of the department
This course is open to all students and the second level of a two-semester sequence in guitar playing. Students will learn guitar repertoire in a variety of styles, including modern chordal accompaniments for simple popular, rock and jazz songs. Fundamentals such as tuning the instrument, open position chords, technique (finger style and plectrum), theory and notation (music notation and tabulature), alternate tunings, and basic aural recognition (scales and chords) will also be covered. This course does not fulfill any requirement for the music major degrees.
Prerequisite: MUS 180
This is a course in part-writing, using triads and diatonic seventh chords, with inversions and non-harmonic tones. The course includes study of short musical forms, analysis and composition of short examples.
Pre-Requisite: MUS112
This course is the second level of a three-semester sequence of music theory courses that focuses on the analysis of fundamental musical materials and stylistic comprehension of music, primarily of the 19th century.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 117 or by permission of the department
This course is the second level of a four-semester sequence in aural skills. Students will develop skills in sight-singing as well as rhythmic, harmonic, and melodic dictation.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 118 or by permission of the department
This course is the second level of a four-semester sequence of keyboard workshop. Students will develop piano keyboard skills through technical exercises, harmonization exercises, scales and arpeggios, harmonic progressions, sight-reading, transposition, improvisation, score-reading, accompanying, and keyboard ensemble work.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 119 or by permission of the department
The course is designed to encourage critical listening by bringing the student into direct contact with music of Western and non-Western cultures. It stresses the elements of music-rhythm, melody, harmony, texture, tone, color-by studying and analyzing their juxtapositions, and their total effect on musical forms and styles of the world. Musical illustrations are analyzed not only in musical terms but in relation to important historical, geographical and ethnological factors.
This course is the first level of a two-semester sequence in musical theatre singing performance skills. Students will be introduced to acting through song, correct vocal techniques and sound production. The interpretation of lyrics as well as the understanding of character, time period and musical style will be emphasized.
Prerequisite: THE 210 and MUS 170, or permission of the instructor and admission is by audition held in Music and Art Department
This course will introduce students to the basics of using a computer for music: musical notation technology, MIDI technology, digital audio technology and recording studio techniques.
MUS 105 or instructor's approval
This course covers the history of Black music in the United States from slavery to present, including a thorough investigation of African backgrounds of the music of slavery, the blues, jazz, gospel, rhythm and blues, as well as Black music in Western art forms. Extensive listening and attendance at live musical performances are required.
This course will introduce the basics of using computer software for music notation, including note and symbol input with computer keyboard and MIDI controller. Students will create original compositions as their final project.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 105 or by permission of the department
This course will introduce students to the basics of recording and editing with computer software and to software plugins and synthesizers. Students will record performances, learn to edit and enhance recorded sounds, create new sounds, and create soundscapes.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 105 or by permission of the department
Continuation of MUS 140 and MUS 150.
This course is the first level of a four-semester sequence in choral performance skills. Students will study and perform repertoire from the Renaissance to the present day. Accompanied and a cappella compositions will be studied with an emphasis on proper blend, vowel placement, clear diction and adherence to healthy vocal habits. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester.
Prerequisite: Permission of the department and admission is by audition
This course is the second level of a four-semester sequence in choral performance skills. Students will study and perform repertoire from the Renaissance to the present day. Accompanied and a cappella compositions will be studied with an emphasis on proper blend, vowel placement, clear diction and adherence to healthy vocal habits. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester.
Prerequisite: MUS 265
This course is the third level of a four-semester sequence in choral performance skills. Students will study and perform repertoire from the Renaissance to the present day. Accompanied and a cappella compositions will be studied with an emphasis on proper blend, vowel placement, clear diction and adherence to healthy vocal habits. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester. Students at this level will be expected to take leadership responsibilities in the ensemble.
Prerequisite: MUS 266
This course is the fourth level of a four-semester sequence in choral performance skills. Students will study and perform repertoire from the Renaissance to the present day. Accompanied and a cappella compositions will be studied with an emphasis on proper blend, vowel placement, clear diction and adherence to healthy vocal habits. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester. Students at this level will be expected to take leadership responsibilities in the ensemble.
Prerequisite: MUS 267
This course is the first level of a four-semester sequence in jazz performance skills. Students will focus on the study of improvisational concepts, chord progressions, interpretation, conception, phrasing, harmonic awareness, dynamic sensitivity, rhythmic and melodic development, and phrase construction. Students are required to participate in performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester.
Prerequisite: Permission of the department and admission is by audition
This course is the second level of a four-semester sequence in jazz performance skills. Students will focus on the study of improvisational concepts, chord progressions, interpretation, conception, phrasing, harmonic awareness, dynamic sensitivity, rhythmic and melodic development, and phrase construction. Students are required to participate in performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester.
Prerequisite: MUS 301
This course is the third level of a four-semester sequence in jazz performance skills. Students will focus on the study of improvisational concepts, chord progressions, interpretation, conception, phrasing, harmonic awareness, dynamic sensitivity, rhythmic and melodic development, and phrase construction. Students are required to participate in performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester. Students at this level will be expected to take leadership responsibilities in the ensemble.
Prerequisite: MUS 302
This course is the fourth level of a four-semester sequence in jazz performance skills. Students will focus on the study of improvisational concepts, chord progressions, interpretation, conception, phrasing, harmonic awareness, dynamic sensitivity, rhythmic and melodic development, and phrase construction. Students are required to participate in performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester. Students at this level will be expected to take leadership responsibilities in the ensemble.
Prerequisite: MUS 303
The course includes the study, preparation, and performance of representative works of the standard, contemporary, and musical theater orchestral literature.
The course includes the study, preparation, and performance of representative works of the standard, contemporary, and musical theater orchestral literature.
Continuation of MUS 305 and MUS 306.
Continuation of MUS 305 and MUS 306.
Chromatic harmony, including altered chords, secondary dominant, the dominant ninth and dominant thirteenth, modulation, analysis and short original compositions are studied.
Continuation of MUS 113 and MUS 213.
This course is the third level of a three-semester sequence of music theory courses that focuses on the analysis of fundamental musical materials and stylistic comprehension of music, primarily of the 20th century.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 217 or by permission of the department
This course is the third level of a four-semester sequence in aural skills. Students will develop skills in sight-singing as well as rhythmic, harmonic, and melodic dictation.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 218 or by permission of the department
This course is the third level of a four-semester sequence of keyboard workshop. Students will develop piano keyboard skills through technical exercises, harmonization exercises, scales and arpeggios, harmonic progressions, sight-reading, transposition, improvisation, score-reading, accompanying, and keyboard ensemble work.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 219 or by permission of the department
Beginning with fundamentals and continuing through large ensemble arranging, the course includes composing for various ensemble combinations. Contemporary techniques such as those of Stockhausen, Ornette Coleman, Penderecki, Persichetti, etc., are explored. Prerequisite: MUS 212 or departmental approval
Continuation of MUS 351.
Chromatic harmony, including altered chords, secondary dominant, the dominant ninth and dominant thirteenth, modulation, analysis and short original compositions are studied.
This course is the fourth level of a four-semester sequence in aural skills. Students will develop skills in sight-singing as well as rhythmic, harmonic, and melodic dictation.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 318 or by permission of the department
This course is the first level of a four-semester sequence of keyboard workshop. Students will develop piano keyboard skills through technical exercises, harmonization exercises, scales and arpeggios, harmonic progressions, sight-reading, transposition, improvisation, score-reading, accompanying, and keyboard ensemble work.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by placement exam or successful completion of MUS 319 or by permission of the department
This course is the third level of a four-semester sequence in wind ensemble performance skills. Students will focus on the study, preparation, and performance of representative works of the standard and contemporary band and wind ensemble literature. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester. Students at this level will be expected to take leadership responsibilities in the ensemble.
Prerequisite: MUS 502
This course is the fourth level of a four-semester sequence in wind ensemble performance skills. Students will focus on the study, preparation, and performance of representative works of the standard and contemporary band and wind ensemble literature. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester. Students at this level will be expected to take leadership responsibilities in the ensemble.
Prerequisite: MUS 503
The instrumental ensemble is designed to develop the performance capability and technique of students who play a musical instrument. The repertoire is selected for both personal development and for public performances at college functions and concerts.
The instrumental ensemble is designed to develop the performance capability and technique of students who play a musical instrument. The repertoire is selected for both personal development and for public performances at college functions and concerts.
Continuation of MUS 510 and MUS 520.
Continuation of MUS 510 and MUS 520.
This course is the third level of a four-semester sequence in brass ensemble performance skills. Students will focus on the study, preparation, and performance of representative works of the standard and contemporary brass ensemble literature. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester. Students at this level will be expected to take leadership responsibilities in the ensemble.
Prerequisite: MUS 602
This course is the fourth level of a four-semester sequence in brass ensemble performance skills. Students will focus on the study, preparation, and performance of representative works of the standard and contemporary brass ensemble literature. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester. Students at this level will be expected to take leadership responsibilities in the ensemble.
Prerequisite: MUS 603
Beginning with scales and arpeggios, this is a study of standard repertoire with emphasis on stylistic interpretation. In addition the student develops sight-reading skills. Entry into private instruction must be approved by the chairperson following an audition.
Beginning with scales and arpeggios, this is a study of standard repertoire with emphasis on stylistic interpretation. In addition the student develops sight-reading skills.
This course is the first level of a four-semester sequence in string performance skills. This course will build on the basic principles of technique and performing on one of the string instruments: violin, viola, cello or double bass. Students will develop performance proficiency, and acquire pedagogical understanding of advanced string techniques. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: Permission of the department and admission is by audition
This course is the second level of a four-semester sequence in string performance skills. This course will build on the basic principles of technique and performing on one of the string instruments: violin, viola, cello or double bass. Students will develop performance proficiency, and acquire pedagogical understanding of advanced string techniques. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 651
This course is the third level of a four-semester sequence in string performance skills. This course will build on the basic principles of technique and performing on one of the string instruments: violin, viola, cello or double bass. Students will develop performance proficiency, and acquire pedagogical understanding of advanced string techniques. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
This course is the fourth level of a four-semester sequence in string performance skills. This course will build on the basic principles of technique and performing on one of the string instruments: violin, viola, cello or double bass. Students will develop performance proficiency, and acquire pedagogical understanding of advanced string techniques. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 653
This course is the first level of a four-semester sequence in piano performance skills. The course will focus on the technical and artistic development of students through assigned exercises and piano repertoire. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: Permission of the department and admission is by audition
This course is the second level of a four-semester sequence in piano performance skills. The course will focus on the technical and artistic development of students through assigned exercises and piano repertoire. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 656
This course is the third level of a four-semester sequence in piano performance skills. The course will focus on the technical and artistic development of students through assigned exercises and piano repertoire. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 657
This course is the fourth level of a four-semester sequence in piano performance skills. The course will focus on the technical and artistic development of students through assigned exercises and piano repertoire. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 658
This course is the first level of a four-semester sequence in woodwind performance skills. In this course students will study their woodwind instrument of specialty. Concepts and skills covered in the class include techniques of tone production, technical facility, and a survey of the solo and ensemble repertoire. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: Permission of the department and admission is by audition
This course is the second level of a four-semester sequence in woodwind performance skills. In this course students will study their woodwind instrument of specialty. Concepts and skills covered in the class include techniques of tone production, technical facility, and a survey of the solo and ensemble repertoire. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 661
This course is the third level of a four-semester sequence in woodwind performance skills. In this course students will study their woodwind instrument of specialty. Concepts and skills covered in the class include techniques of tone production, technical facility, and a survey of the solo and ensemble repertoire. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 662
This course is the fourth level of a four-semester sequence in woodwind performance skills. In this course students will study their woodwind instrument of specialty. Concepts and skills covered in the class include techniques of tone production, technical facility, and a survey of the solo and ensemble repertoire. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 663
This course is the first level of a four-semester sequence in brass performance skills. In this course students will study their brass instrument of specialty. Concepts and skills covered include techniques of tone production, technical facility, and a survey of introduction to the solo and ensemble repertoire on the student’s instrument. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: Permission of the department and Admission is by audition
This course is the second level of a four-semester sequence in brass performance skills. In this course students will study their brass instrument of specialty. Concepts and skills covered include techniques of tone production, technical facility, and a survey of introduction to the solo and ensemble repertoire on the student’s instrument. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 666
This course is the third level of a four-semester sequence in brass performance skills. In this course students will study their brass instrument of specialty. Concepts and skills covered include techniques of tone production, technical facility, and a survey of introduction to the solo and ensemble repertoire on the student’s instrument. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 667
This course is the fourth level of a four-semester sequence in brass performance skills. In this course students will study their brass instrument of specialty. Concepts and skills covered include techniques of tone production, technical facility, and a survey of introduction to the solo and ensemble repertoire on the student’s instrument. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 668
This course is the first level of a four-semester sequence in vocal performance skills. Students will be introduced to basic techniques in vocal production: alignment, breathing, vowels, resonance, and energy. Students will learn one or more pieces in the following languages: English, Italian, German, or French. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: Permission of the department and admission is by audition
This course is the second level of a four-semester sequence in vocal performance skills. Students will be introduced to basic techniques in vocal production: alignment, breathing, vowels, resonance, and energy. Students will learn one or more pieces in the following languages: English, Italian, German, or French. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 671
This course is the third level of a four-semester sequence in vocal performance skills. Students will be introduced to basic techniques in vocal production: alignment, breathing, vowels, resonance, and energy. Students will learn one or more pieces in the following languages: English, Italian, German, or French. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 672
This course is the fourth level of a four-semester sequence in vocal performance skills. Students will be introduced to basic techniques in vocal production: alignment, breathing, vowels, resonance, and energy. Students will learn one or more pieces in the following languages: English, Italian, German, or French. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 673
This course is the first level of a four-semester sequence in guitar performance skills. Students will be assigned technical exercises and works to be performed. Music theory, aural skills, sight-reading and musicianship appropriate to the level of practical ability will also be covered. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: Permission of the department and admission is by audition
This course is the second level of a four-semester sequence in guitar performance skills. Students will be assigned technical exercises and works to be performed. Music theory, aural skills, sight-reading and musicianship appropriate to the level of practical ability will also be covered. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 676
This course is the third level of a four-semester sequence in guitar performance skills. Students will be assigned technical exercises and works to be performed. Music theory, aural skills, sight-reading and musicianship appropriate to the level of practical ability will also be covered. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 677
This course is the fourth level of a four-semester sequence in guitar performance skills. Students will be assigned technical exercises and works to be performed. Music theory, aural skills, sight-reading and musicianship appropriate to the level of practical ability will also be covered. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 678
This course is the first level of a four-semester sequence in music composition for advanced music students. Students will work on projects under the supervision of the instructor. Compositional techniques will be explored and relevant repertoire will be analyzed.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by successful completion of MUS 217 or by permission of the department
This course is the second level of a four-semester sequence in music composition for advanced music students. Students will work on projects under the supervision of the instructor. Compositional techniques will be explored and relevant repertoire will be analyzed.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by successful completion of MUS 681 or by permission of the department
This course is the third level of a four-semester sequence in music composition for advanced music students. Students will work on projects under the supervision of the instructor. Compositional techniques will be explored and relevant repertoire will be analyzed.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by successful completion of MUS 682 or by permission of the department
This course is the fourth level of a four-semester sequence in music composition for advanced music students. Students will work on projects under the supervision of the instructor. Compositional techniques will be explored and relevant repertoire will be analyzed.
Prerequisite: Entrance is by successful completion of MUS 683 or by permission of the department
This course is the first level of a four-semester sequence in percussion performance skills. Students will be assigned technical exercises and works to be performed on a variety of percussion instruments. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: Permission of the department and admission is by audition
This course is the second level of a four-semester sequence in percussion performance skills. Students will be assigned technical exercises and works to be performed on a variety of percussion instruments. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 686
This course is the third level of a four-semester sequence in percussion performance skills. Students will be assigned technical exercises and works to be performed on a variety of percussion instruments. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 687
This course is the fourth level of a four-semester sequence in percussion performance skills. Students will be assigned technical exercises and works to be performed on a variety of percussion instruments. Juries and recitals of solo performances will be required. All applied studies for music majors include a weekly one-hour individual lesson and two-hour studio lab.
Prerequisite: MUS 688
This course is the first level of a four-semester sequence in string ensemble performance skills. Students will focus on the study, preparation, and performance of representative works of the standard and contemporary string orchestra literature. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester.
Prerequisite: Permission of the department and admission is by audition
This course is the second level of a four-semester sequence in string ensemble performance skills. Students will focus on the study, preparation, and performance of representative works of the standard and contemporary string orchestra literature. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester.
Prerequisite: MUS 701
This course is the third level of a four-semester sequence in string ensemble performance skills. Students will focus on the study, preparation, and performance of representative works of the standard and contemporary string orchestra literature. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester. Students at this level will be expected to take leadership responsibilities in the ensemble.
Prerequisite: MUS 702
This course is the fourth level of a four-semester sequence in string ensemble performance skills. Students will focus on the study, preparation, and performance of representative works of the standard and contemporary string orchestra literature. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester. Students at this level will be expected to take leadership responsibilities in the ensemble.
MUS 703
This course is the first level of a four-semester sequence in guitar ensemble performance skills. Students will study and perform repertoire from the Baroque to the present day. The course will focus on active participation in the process of preparing for performance including listening skills, sight-reading, intonation, rhythm, tone, and ensemble precision. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester.
Prerequisite: Permission of the department and admission is by audition
This course is the second level of a four-semester sequence in guitar ensemble performance skills. Students will study and perform repertoire from the Baroque to the present day. The course will focus on active participation in the process of preparing for performance including listening skills, sight-reading, intonation, rhythm, tone, and ensemble precision. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester.
Prerequisite: MUS 705
This course is the third level of a four-semester sequence in guitar ensemble performance skills. Students will study and perform repertoire from the Baroque to the present day. The course will focus on active participation in the process of preparing for performance including listening skills, sight-reading, intonation, rhythm, tone, and ensemble precision. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester. Students at this level will be expected to take leadership responsibilities in the ensemble.
Prerequisite: MUS 706
This course is the fourth level of a four-semester sequence in guitar ensemble performance skills. Students will study and perform repertoire from the Baroque to the present day. The course will focus on active participation in the process of preparing for performance including listening skills, sight-reading, intonation, rhythm, tone, and ensemble precision. Students are required to participate in all performances. Ensembles perform at least one concert per semester. Students at this level will be expected to take leadership responsibilities in the ensemble.
Prerequisite: MUS 707
This course studies the history and development of Puerto Rican music, beginning with an analysis of the role of music in each of the three cultures (Arawak, Spanish, and West African) that comprise the Puerto Rican society. The characteristics of each one of these musics, the relationship between music and social organization, and the presence of these characteristics in the music of the Colonial period are examined. The growth of the Puerto Rican society during the 18th and 19th centuries and its resulting social divisions are studied as the groundwork to analyze the relation between music and social class. The marked influence of West African rhythms in the contemporary music of the Caribbean and the connection between music and national identity are also studied. Lectures are supplemented with tapes, phonograph records, and live performances.

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