Course Listings

The following courses are offered by the Academic Literacy and Linguistics Department.

Critical Thinking

Critical Thinking (Same as CRT 100) is designed to develop the mind and help students learn to think clearly and effectively. Through substantive readings, structured writing assignments and ongoing discussions, students will examine concrete examples from their own experience and readings and contemporary issues in the media to learn how to analyze issues, solve problems, and make informed decisions in their academic, professional, and personal lives.

English as a Second Language

These two Intensive English courses are designed in their combined form to improve the reading/writing and aural/oral skills of the beginning and low-intermediate student. These two courses must be taken concurrently and are obligatory for one semester for all incoming ESL students whose placement examinations show a need for instruction at this level.
Corequisite: ESL 54
These two Intensive English courses are designed in their combined form to improve the reading/writing and aural/oral skills of the beginning and low-intermediate student. These two courses must be taken concurrently and are obligatory for one semester for all incoming ESL students whose placement examinations show a need for instruction at this level.
Corequisite: ESL 49
This is a high-intermediate level course that combines listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Narrative and descriptive writing are emphasized and expository writing is introduced.
This advanced level course emphasizes writing and reading skills; however, oral skills are not neglected. In writing, students focus on introducing, developing, supporting, and organizing their ideas in expository essays as well as in narrative and descriptive writing.
This intensive writing course for ESL students focuses on basic components of effective writing, including paragraph development and structure, sentence structure, word choice, and content. Students read and respond to a variety of texts and use argumentation, narrative, and description as modes of developing ideas in writing.
ESL 96 is an intensive reading and writing course for ESL students. It focuses on basic components of effective writing, including essay organization, paragraph development, sentence structure, word choice, and content. Students read and respond to a variety of texts and use argumentation, narrative, and description as modes of developing ideas in writing. This course is designed to help students master and apply a full range of college-level reading, and related skills, including critical comprehension, vocabulary, writing, flexible rates of reading, and study strategies. A variety of college-level materials is used.

Linguistics

This course will introduce the student to the study of Language and Culture. The course will introduce related topics, such as bilingual/bidialectal families and bilingual education, language and gender, literacy in a changing, technological society, child language acquisition, and different dialects and registers of English. The readings will draw on works in linguistics, literature and related fields. Students will work on critical reading and produce writing based on the readings in connections with their own experiences and backgrounds.
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the grammatical structures of standard American English, allowing them to read, write, and interpret written texts critically and efficiently Through analysis and discovery, students will learn to evaluate the grammaticality of the written work they produce in their academic coursework. In addition, students will explore a variety of writing genres and styles, and learn to manipulate language more effectively, enriching both their production and understanding of written texts.
This course will introduce students to linguistics, the scientific study of language. Students will apply methods of scientific inquiry (including the scientific method) to linguistic systems (phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic) and language phenomena and events. Specifically, students will engage in observation of linguistic phenomena, collection of data, generation and testing of hypotheses, analysis of and interpretations of data, application and evaluation of theory, in order to form conclusions about linguistic phenomena.
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the sound system of English, with a focus on Standard American English and non-standard dialects of American English. The course will introduce students to the physical production of sounds as well as the mental perception of sounds and how they pattern in English, allowing students to notice and identify the distinct sounds of English, and to develop an awareness of the rich variation within the language. The course will also introduce students to phonetic transcription, highlighting the contrast between sound and spelling, particularly in English.
This course explores historical, cultural, and theoretical perspectives on the relationship between language, race, and ethnicity in the United States and its territories. It examines how language is understood to reflect, reproduce, and/or challenge and defy racial and ethnic boundaries, and how ideas about race and ethnicity influence the ways in which people use and construe language. It covers topics such as racialization and racism, ethnicization, notions of authenticity, repertoire, codeswitching and style shifting, linguistic mocking and linguistic racism, language ideology, and identity formation. This course will examine language varieties such as Black American English and its cross-racial uses by other groups, Chicano English and Spanglish, Hawaiian English, and American Indian English.
The first part of this course introduces students to theories of first language acquisition (e.g., developmental sequence, innateness hypothesis). In the second part of the course, students will become familiar with the theories of second language acquisition and factors such as motivation, age, learning styles that affect language learning. Students will develop an awareness of processes involved in language acquisition, both first and second.
Prerequisites: Any 100-level LIN course or Department Approval
This introductory course provides an overview of the psychological, social, and political aspects of bilingualism. Topics covered include definitions of bilingualism, language development in bilingual children, the linguistic behaviors of bilingual speakers, language loss and maintenance, and socio-political issues pertaining to bilingual language policy and planning.
Prerequisites: ENG 100.5 or ENG 101 or Any 100-level LIN course or Departmental Approval
This course will provide students with an understanding of the theoretical foundations and principles of language instruction and language learning. Special emphasis will be on studying pedagogical approaches to TESOL that address the learning needs of diverse language learners in multiple settings (e.g. one-on-one or small group tutoring vs. classroom). Topics will include relationships between and identities of practitioners and learners (e.g. racial, ethnic, linguistic, typical and atypical), research-based methodologies, teaching for productive and receptive language skills, and the relationship between curriculum planning, assessment, and feedback.
Prerequisites: [ENG 100.5 or ENG 101] and LIN 120 or Departmental Approval
Through this course, students will analyze how power manifests itself through language and how people use language to create, reproduce, or resist/defy power. By studying the relationship between language and capital, language and institutionalized oppression (e.g. racism, ethnocentrism), and language and activism, students will explore the relationship between language, inequity, domination, and resistance. Students will analyze, through applying Critical Discourse Analysis to language events related to politics, policy, media, and institutional interaction, the power and perceived value of certain dialects and languages (e.g., discrimination towards and ideologies about languages/dialects). Students will engage with relevant critical social and linguistic theories relating to power.
Prerequisites: ENG 100.5 or ENG 101 or Any 100-level LIN course or Departmental Approval
This three credit, 200-level course will explore the complex relationship between language and the law. The course critically considers the role of language and its power in the legal process. Three branches of forensic linguistics (handwriting, phonology, and discourse analysis) will be discussed. We will examine the work of dialectologists, creolists, and graphologists who have used linguistic evidence to interpret evidence (e.g., blackmail and ransom notes), and voice and spectrogram analysis will also be discussed. The course will also examine how linguists are involved in the legal process when they serve as expert witnesses.
Prerequisite: ENG 201
This course introduces students to the study of language events related to gender and sexuality. Practicing framing, speech act analysis, and discourse analysis, students will examine the relationship between cultural values, language, gender, and sexuality. Students will analyze, with examples from global languages, how gender and sexuality affect language use and communities of practice as well as language affects understandings of gender and sexuality.
Prerequisite: [ENG 100.5 or ENG 101] and LIN 100; or departmental approval

Critical Reading

This introductory college level reading course emphasizes improved reading comprehension through the practice of literal, inferential and critical reading skills, vocabulary development, writing, flexible reading rates, and study skills. A variety of materials is used to enrich students¿ basic understanding of reading.
This advanced reading course is designed to help students master a full range of college-level reading and related skills, including critical comprehension, vocabulary, writing, flexible rates of reading, and study strategies. A variety of college-level materials is used.
Through this course, students will learn about diverse perspectives about language and literacy development, specifically atypical development, of children (birth through adolescence). Students will confront questions facing scholars regarding typical and atypical development as well as the nature of typical and atypical second and multiple language development. Specific attention will be paid to language disorders, language delays, dyslexia and developmental disorders related to language and literacy.
Prerequisites: ENG 100.5 or ENG 101 or Departmental Approval

Academic Literacy and Linguistics|Office Directory|Contact & Office Hours

  • BMCC logo
The City University of New York

Borough of Manhattan Community College
The City University of New York
199 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007
212-220-8000 | Directory

Text Only Version