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Criminal Justice

BMCC students enrolling in Criminal Justice will take courses, such as Criminology, Policing, Corrections and Criminal Law. In addition, the BMCC curriculum will provide a solid foundation in general education with courses such as English Composition, Speech, Sociology, Statistics and Macroeconomics.

General Requirements

This course is intended primarily for those students who intend to pursue professional careers in fields such as economics, finance, management, and administration. It is also open to highly motivated students in other areas. Topics include: national income and national product; saving, consumption, investment, the multiplier theory, fiscal policy, inflation, employment and business cycles. The student will also be acquainted with money, banking, and central bank monetary policies, as well as some of the more significant theories of international trade and economic development.
This is the first college level writing course. Readings are used to stimulate critical thinking and to provide students with models for effective writing. Students become acquainted with the process of writing, from pre-writing activities to producing a final, proofread draft. Grammar and syntax are discussed as needed. At the end of this course, students take a departmental essay examination that requires them to compose, draft, and edit a thesis-centered essay of at least 500 words. Prerequisite: Pass the CATR and CATW tests
This is a course that builds upon skills introduced in English 101. In this course, literature is the field for the development of critical reading, critical thinking, independent research, and writing skills. Students are introduced to literary criticisms and acquire basic knowledge necessary for the analysis of texts (including literary terms and some literary theory); they gain proficiency in library and internet research; and they hone their skills as readers and writers. Assignments move from close readings of literary texts in a variety of genres to analyses that introduce literary terms and broader contexts, culminating in an independent, documented, thesis-driven research paper. By the conclusion of English 201, students will be prepared for the analytical and research-based writing required in upper-level courses across the curriculum; they will also be prepared for advanced courses in literature. Prerequisite: ENG 101
This is an introductory survey course to health education. The course provides students with the knowledge, skills, and behavioral models to enhance their physical, emotional, social, intellectual and spiritual health as well as facilitate their health decision-making ability. The primary areas of instruction include: health and wellness; stress; human sexuality; alcohol, tobacco and substance abuse; nutrition and weight management; and physical fitness. Students who have completed HED 110 - Comprehensive Health Education will not receive credit for this course.
This course covers basic statistics, including: measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, graphs, correlation, the regression line, confidence intervals, the significance of differences, and hypothesis testing, including z-tests, t-tests, and chi-square tests.
The history, development, and intellectual origin of American government are studied and analyzed. Special consideration is given to the structure and operation of the executive, legislative and judiciary branches, and the role of government and politics in a modern industrial society.
This course analyzes the structure, processes and products associated with group living. Attention is focused on the concepts of social organization, culture, groups, stratification, major social institutions, and significant trends in group living.
The aim of this course is to develop effective skills in speech communication. The student examines how to generate topics and organized ideas, masters elements of audience psychology and practices techniques of speech presentation in a public forum. All elements of speech production and presentation are considered.
2. A two-semester sequence in the same language is required. For students who are native speakers of Chinese, French, Italian, or Spanish, testing and placement by the Modern Language Department is required. Spanish language literature courses offered by the Center for Ethnic Studies may also be used to satisfy the liberal arts foreign language requirement
2. A two-semester sequence in the same language is required. For students who are native speakers of Chinese, French, Italian, or Spanish, testing and placement by the Modern Language Department is required. Spanish language literature courses offered by the Center for Ethnic Studies may also be used to satisfy the liberal arts foreign language requirement
English Literature I (371); English Literature II (372); American Literature I (381); American Literature II (382); The American Novel (383); World Literature I (391); or World Literature II (392)
This introduction to art principles and terms includes the study of the plastic arts: nature, content, and form. The meaning of illusion and abstraction, style and the changing concept of reality in art throughout history are explored. Selected paintings, sculpture, and architecture are examined.
OR
The ability to listen to music intelligently and to recognize specific styles, forms, and idioms are developed in this course. Consideration is given to musical aspects of the historical eras from the early Christian period to the present. Students are required to attend concerts and do assigned reading and listening.

45

Total General Credits

Curriculum Requirements

The aim of this course is to familiarize students with the Criminal justice System and four of its components: the police, courts, corrections, and the Juvenile Justice System and how it operates is essential to successful navigation of daily activities in an urban environment.
This course is designed to expose the student to many diverse theories that characterize criminology. Theories and empirical research will be presented concerning deviant and criminal behavior and the extent to which these ideas have been applied both in practice and in policy. The implications of each will be examined.
This course is intended to broaden the students understanding of law enforcement, focusing on many of the contradictions and paradoxes that American police present. They are the largest agency in the Criminal Justice System, yet much of their work does not invovle crimes or justice. Police see their primary job as catching criminals, but they spend most of their engaged in other activities. This course focuses on police field behavior and will examine many of these contradictions, first tracing the origins and history of American policing; then focusing on many of the contemporary issues facing police departments today.
Prerequisite: CRJ 101
This course covers the policies and practices of the Criminal Justice System following the offender's arrest and conviction of a crime. This history of corrections is reviewed, and the functions of agencies that provide correctional services is covered: jails, probation, prisons, parole and intermediate sanctions. The course also considers important controversies and major trends in contemporary correctional practice.
Prerequisite: CRJ 101
This is an introductory course in the study of criminal law, general legal principles, and how the criminal law functions in and affects modern society. This course highlights a variety of key topics, including the concept of crime and the development of criminal law, defenses to criminal charges, and a number of specific types of crimes, including personal crimes, property crimes, public order crimes, and offenses aainst public morality. legal issues affecting punishment will also be discussed, as will ways the criminal law impacts victims of crime.
Prerequisite: CRJ 101
OR
This course takes a critical approach to the study of crime and justice in urban settings. Course materials examine contemporary crime-related issues that affect urban communities within a historical and sociological context. The course highlights the intersections of deviant behavior and the criminal justice system within the structures of class, race, gender, and power inequalities. Topics explored may include racial profiling, juvenile delinquency, media representations of crime, policing, the war on drugs, and prisoner re-entry.
Prerequisite: CRJ 101

15

Total Curriculum Credits

 60

Total Program Credits

 

Note:
1. For students whose first language in not English, SPE 102 will also satisfy this requirement.

2. A two-semester sequence in the same language is required. For students who are native speakers of Chinese, French, Italian, or Spanish, testing and placement by the Modern Language Department is required. Spanish language literature courses offered by the Center for Ethnic Studies may also be used to satisfy the liberal arts foreign language requirement.

3. Please note that MAT012 or MAT051 or exemption from Elementary Algebra is a prerequisite for MAT150.

4. Select one to complete program requirements.